Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Voice of the HeartThe Working of Mervyn Peake's Imagination$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

G. Peter Winnington

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9781846310225

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846314391

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 14 December 2018

Solitude

Solitude

Chapter:
(p.28) 2 Solitude
Source:
The Voice of the Heart
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846310225.003.0003

Mervyn Peake concludes his Introduction to Drawings with a revealing statement of belief about the role of the artist: As the earth was thrown from the sun, so from the earth the artist must fling out into space, complete from pole to pole, his own world which, whatsoever form it takes, is the colour of the globe it flew from, as the world itself is coloured by the sun. This chapter examines two avenues of investigation that this double comparison opens up: the significance of space; and Peake's view of himself as a god-like creator. These lead to the theology that lies behind Peake's works and the existential solitude that characterizes them.

Keywords:   space, creator, theology, existential solitude

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.