Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Byron in GenevaThat Summer of 1816$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David Ellis

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781846316432

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846317163

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 21 November 2017

Chillon, Clarens and Ouchy

Chillon, Clarens and Ouchy

Chapter:
(p.60) 8 Chillon, Clarens and Ouchy
Source:
Byron in Geneva
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/UPO9781846317163.010

Before he died, Lord Byron made a request that his body should not be hacked or sent to England. Yet Byron suffered the same fate as John Polidori's unfortunate patient, Lord Guilford, who was shipped back to England from Italy in pieces. An exception was that the Greeks kept his lungs. When the rest of Byron's body arrived in England, his friend John Cam Hobhouse enquire about whether he could be buried in Westminster Abbey, to which the Abbey authorities responded favourably. Hobhouse also took care of the funeral arrangements. A funeral procession of carriages set out northwards from central London on July 12, 1824. Of the members of the group who stayed with Byron in Geneva in 1816 and were still alive at the time, only Scrope Berdmore Davies and Claire Clairmont did not attend his burial.

Keywords:   Lord Byron, funeral, burial, England, John Cam Hobhouse, Scrope Berdmore Davies, Claire Clairmont, Westminster Abbey

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.