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American CreolesThe Francophone Caribbean and the American South$
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Martin Munro and Celia Britton

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781846317538

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846317200

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date: 21 November 2017

Auguste Lussan's La Famille créole: How Saint-Domingue Émigrés Became Louisiana Creoles

Auguste Lussan's La Famille créole: How Saint-Domingue Émigrés Became Louisiana Creoles

Chapter:
(p.40) Auguste Lussan's La Famille créole: How Saint-Domingue Émigrés Became Louisiana Creoles
Source:
American Creoles
Author(s):

Typhaine Leservot

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/UPO9781846317200.003

This chapter analyses Auguste Lussan's play, La Famille créole [The Creole Family] (1837), which shows the changing understanding of the Creole identity in Louisiana by the 1830s. The play is set in 1794 and tells the story of a family of planter refugees, the Clairvilles, who left Saint-Domingue and arrived in New Orleans before moving to France. While in Paris, the father and the daughter are wrongfully accused of treason and are nearly guillotined. They then returned to Louisiana, which became their only place of salvation. The play presents the Clairville family not as past slaveholders in the Caribbean but as innocents who are neither revolutionaries nor royalists. Without any inconvenient cultural allegiances to Saint-Domingue and France, they are rendered more compelling as new American citizens.

Keywords:   Auguste Lussan, La Famille créole, The Creole Family, Creole, Louisiana, Clairvilles, Saint-Dominique, New Orleans, Paris, France

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