Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Future WarsThe Anticipations and the Fears$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David Seed

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781846317552

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846317224

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 21 November 2017

‘The Benefit and the Handicap of Hindsight’: Modelling Risk and Reassessing Future-War Fiction After the 9/11-Induced Shift to a US National Security Strategy of Pre-emptive Attack1

‘The Benefit and the Handicap of Hindsight’: Modelling Risk and Reassessing Future-War Fiction After the 9/11-Induced Shift to a US National Security Strategy of Pre-emptive Attack1

Chapter:
(p.218) 12. ‘The Benefit and the Handicap of Hindsight’: Modelling Risk and Reassessing Future-War Fiction After the 9/11-Induced Shift to a US National Security Strategy of Pre-emptive Attack1
Source:
Future Wars
Author(s):

A. Michael Matin

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846317552.003.0013

Analysts in the future, say in the year 2035, looking back at the impact of 9/11 on the United States may see the most salient and enduring effects not to be any of the direct responses (either of action, policy or attitude), but rather a general rethinking of means of evaluating and responding to perceived threats. In fact, the mixed political and military results of the United States-led reactions to the events of 9/11 are currently stimulating just such a reconsideration. This chapter explores some of the ways in which this emerging development and the study of national security-oriented fiction may mutually inform one another.

Keywords:   United States, defence policy, September 2001, terrorist attacks, perceived threats, national security, fiction

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.