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Future WarsThe Anticipations and the Fears$
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David Seed

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781846317552

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846317224

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date: 21 November 2017

John Henry Palmer's The Invasion of New York, or, How Hawaii Was Annexed: Political Discourse and Emergent Mass Culture in 1897

John Henry Palmer's The Invasion of New York, or, How Hawaii Was Annexed: Political Discourse and Emergent Mass Culture in 1897

Chapter:
(p.85) 5. John Henry Palmer's The Invasion of New York, or, How Hawaii Was Annexed: Political Discourse and Emergent Mass Culture in 1897
Source:
Future Wars
Author(s):

John Rieder

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846317552.003.0006

This chapter examines John Henry Palmer's The Invasion of New York, or, How Hawaii Was Annexed. It argues that the significance of Palmer's book is that it demonstrates the remarkable instability of the opposition between the political and the fantastic in the burgeoning sphere of mass circulated print in the late 1890s. The point is not whether Palmer's fantasies had an impact on the annexation debate, but rather that they had their origin in the publicity generated by the debate, and that the debate itself was immersed in an emerging mass-cultural milieu where fact and rumour and outright fantasy were often hard to tell apart and were sometimes deliberately confused. Palmer's understanding of the issues reflects not only his sympathies with imperialists like the up-and-coming Theodore Roosevelt, but also the success of the Hawaiian pro-annexationists at making their case in the public venues of newspaper reporting and editorializing.

Keywords:   future-war fiction, mass printing, annexation, debate

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