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Markets, Market Culture and Popular Protest in Eighteenth-Century Britain and Ireland$
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Adrian Randall and Andrew Charlesworth

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780853237006

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846317422

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date: 22 November 2017

Popular Protest and the Persistence of Customary Corn Measures: Resistance to the Winchester Bushel in the English West

Popular Protest and the Persistence of Customary Corn Measures: Resistance to the Winchester Bushel in the English West

Chapter:
(p.25) Chapter 2 Popular Protest and the Persistence of Customary Corn Measures: Resistance to the Winchester Bushel in the English West
Source:
Markets, Market Culture and Popular Protest in Eighteenth-Century Britain and Ireland
Author(s):
Richard Sheldon, Adrian Randall, Andrew Randall, David Walsh
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/UPO9781846317422.003

This chapter examines the sources and values of the stubborn resistance to the implementation of the Winchester bushel in the eighteenth century with particular reference to the West of England as a case study. It discusses the history of the Winchester standards, and highlights the role of the market as a site for economic and extra-economic activities and plebian consciousness. The analysis indicates that the protracted resistance to the implementation of the Winchester bushel to some extent points towards a ‘conservative’ and backward-looking mentality among labouring consumers and small farmers.

Keywords:   Winchester bushel, West of England, market, plebian consciousness, backward-looking mentality, laboring consumers, farmers

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