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Black SaltSeafarers of African Descent on British Ships$
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Ray Costello

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781846318184

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846317675

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date: 22 November 2017

After Empire

After Empire

Chapter:
(p.193) Chapter Eleven After Empire
Source:
Black Salt
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/UPO9781846317675.013

This chapter evaluates the position of black seamen after the demise of the British Empire. Events on the African continent were on course to deprive Britain of a direct source of seafarers of African descent. The newly independent West African countries considered their own issues of naval defence. Following the Second World War, changes in attitudes towards black people were slowly developing. The attitudes towards black seafarers enhanced in the 1960s and 1970s. Merchant shipping declined in status throughout the twentieth century, striking British seafarers of all races hard. Finally, the chapter talks about how Neville Bryce was the Navy's first black ‘chief of boat’. He became Lieutenant Commander in the British Senior Service and a Member of the British Empire.

Keywords:   black seamen, British Empire, black seafarers, merchant shipping, Britain, naval defence, Second World War, Royal Navy, Neville Bryce

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