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Civilians and War in Europe, 1618–1815$
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Erica Charters, Eve Rosenhaft, and Hannah Smith

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781846317118

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846317699

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date: 22 November 2017

Transitional Justice Theory and Reconciling Civil War Division in English Society, circa 1660–1670 1

Transitional Justice Theory and Reconciling Civil War Division in English Society, circa 1660–1670 1

Chapter:
(p.68) 5 Transitional Justice Theory and Reconciling Civil War Division in English Society, circa 1660–1670 1
Source:
Civilians and War in Europe, 1618–1815
Author(s):

Melanie Harrington

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/UPO9781846317699.005

The conflict between King Charles I and his parliaments over the scope of royal authority and the direction of the post-Reformation Church of England resulted in the civil wars from 1638 to 1651. Charles I was executed in front of thousands of people in January 1649. Using the emerging field of transitional justice theory, this chapter examines post-civil war England in order to understand the decisions made by the Restoration regime in trying to reconcile a divided post-war society with contemporary expectations of justice and retribution. Although the new regime may have averted another civil war, the threat of renewed conflict and chaos always loomed on the horizon. This may be attributed to the lack of material and psychological reparation towards royalists, which limited the extent of civilians' participation in the transition to peace.

Keywords:   Charles I, civil wars, England, transitional justice theory, Restoration, justice, retribution, royalists, civilians, peace

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