Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Civilians and War in Europe, 1618–1815$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Erica Charters, Eve Rosenhaft, and Hannah Smith

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781846317118

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846317699

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 14 December 2017

Restricted Violence? Military Occupation during the Eighteenth Century

Restricted Violence? Military Occupation during the Eighteenth Century

Chapter:
(p.118) 8 Restricted Violence? Military Occupation during the Eighteenth Century
Source:
Civilians and War in Europe, 1618–1815
Author(s):

Horst Carl

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/UPO9781846317699.008

Based on international law, military occupation, which is defined as a legally and customarily defined situation that differs from military conquest, territorial annexation, or regime change, is, as a phenomenon, central to the relationship between civilians and war. This chapter challenges the notion that military occupation has been a transhistorical feature of war since ancient times and argues that it has a historically specific character in the context of warfare in continental Europe. Military occupation is both an index and a component of the ‘bureaucratisation’ or rationalisation of war. The chapter examines the administration of occupation in the German territories during the mid-eighteenth century, focusing on the development of a regulated system of payments, billeting, and political intervention as well as arbitrary violence during occupation. It also considers irregular warfare, or kleiner Krieg, and how patriotism undermined efforts directed towards the ‘containment’ of war.

Keywords:   Europe, international law, military occupation, military conquest, civilians, payments, billeting, violence, kleiner Krieg, patriotism

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.