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French CyclingA Social and Cultural History$
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Hugh Dauncey

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781846318351

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846317859

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date: 22 November 2017

From Defeat to the New France: Sport and Society, Cycling and Everyday Life, 1940–1959

From Defeat to the New France: Sport and Society, Cycling and Everyday Life, 1940–1959

Chapter:
(p.129) 6 From Defeat to the New France: Sport and Society, Cycling and Everyday Life, 1940–1959
Source:
French Cycling
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/UPO9781846317859.006

This chapter tells why the years of the Occupation and Vichy were considered torment by historians of sports and public policy. It states that during the war years, France felt significant disruption in sporting activities brought about by either the absence of able-bodied men who served in the war; or by logistical difficulties in areas such as transport, fuel and electricity. It goes on to say that in terms of practicality, cycling faced a period of challenge in the years of war and during the Fourth Republic. While cycling flourished as a mode of personal transport in the 1940s, the economic growth in the following decade allowed households to explore other modes of transport. Furthermore, this chapter discusses how the Vichy and Fourth Republic tried to manage sport and cycling in general through ideologies, institutions and policies. The chapter also highlights how the Tour de France redefined France's identity in the 1940s and 1950s.

Keywords:   occupation, Vichy, Fourth Republic, Tour de France, cycling

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