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Race, Ethnicity and Nuclear WarRepresentations of Nuclear Weapons and Post-Apocalyptic Worlds$
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Paul Williams

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781846317088

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.5949/UPO9781846319792

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date: 20 October 2018

Race, War and Apocalypse before 1945

Race, War and Apocalypse before 1945

Chapter:
(p.25) 1 Race, War and Apocalypse before 1945
Source:
Race, Ethnicity and Nuclear War
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846317088.003.0002

This chapter discusses premonitions since the late nineteenth century of an apocalyptic race war fought with the newest, most destructive technology. It begins by outlining the myths of racial destiny generated from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, most centrally the Aryan myth of eradicating Judaism that would inform the policies of Nazi Germany. It then surveys (primarily Anglophone) future-war fiction of the same period, which imagined interracial and interethnic conflicts fought with weapons so powerful they would decisively determine the outcome of wars. The final section looks at the racial and exterminatory dimensions of early aerial warfare, concluding with the rhetoric of interracial competition between Japan and America before and during World War Two, and the contemporaneous perception that another monumental war would be required to secure the rule of whites on the Asian continent.

Keywords:   racial destiny, Aryan myth, Judaism, Nazi Germany, future-war fiction, aerial warfare, interracial competition

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