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The Black Legend of Prince Rupert's Dog
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The Black Legend of Prince Rupert's Dog: Witchcraft and Propaganda during the English Civil War

Mark Stoyle

Abstract

One of the more bizarre consequences of the English Civil War of 1642-46 was the elevation to celebrity status of a ‘dog-witch’ named Boy. The loyal companion of King Charles I's nephew, Prince Rupert of the Rhine, Boy, like his master, was held to possess supernatural powers and was frequently portrayed in the popular literature of the day as a ‘devil’, as a witch or as a witch's familiar spirit. Some measure of the interest which Boy aroused among contemporaries may be gleaned from the fact that no fewer than five separate images of him were produced for public consumption between 1643 and 1 ... More

Keywords: Witchcraft*, Propaganda*, Prince Rupert*, Civil War, John Cleveland (poet), Print Culture*, Royalism, Dogs*, Familiars, Poodles

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2011 Print ISBN-13: 9780859898591
Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2014 DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780859898591.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Mark Stoyle, author