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Virginia Woolf and the Common(wealth) Reader$
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Helen Wussow and Mary Ann Gillies

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780989082679

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9780989082679.001.0001

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date: 25 November 2017

Synthesizing Civilizations

Synthesizing Civilizations

Leonard Woolf, the League of Nations, and the Inverse of Imperialism, 1928–1933

Chapter:
(p.18) Synthesizing Civilizations
Source:
Virginia Woolf and the Common(wealth) Reader
Author(s):

Wayne K. Chapman

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780989082679.003.0002

This chapter discusses the work undertaken by Leonard Woolf, with the notable assistance of his wife and several associates, on various projects for the Fabian Society, the League of Nations Society, and the Labour Party Research Department. During the First World War, by his own account, Woolf “worked with others to ensure that the creation of a League of Nations should be part of the peace settlement.” After writing International Government (1916) and Empire and Commerce in Africa (1920), as well as taking turns at editing War and Peace, The International Review, and The Nation and The Athenaeum through the 1920s, Woolf returned to the subject of the League when he stepped down as literary editor of the latter and co-founded The Political Quarterly. In 1928 he published Imperialism and Civilization where he argued that in the League of Nations the solution of international problems depended on a “synthesis of civilizations,” by which he meant a “stable and smooth adjustment of the political and economic relations of peoples, nations, States, and governments from Peking to Peru”.

Keywords:   Leonard Woolf, empire, League of Nations, Imperialism and Civilization

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