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Virginia Woolf and the Common(wealth) Reader$
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Helen Wussow and Mary Ann Gillies

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780989082679

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9780989082679.001.0001

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date: 16 December 2017

Preserving Our History of Reading Woolf

Preserving Our History of Reading Woolf

The Common Wealth of Our Past and Future

Chapter:
(p.198) Preserving Our History of Reading Woolf
Source:
Virginia Woolf and the Common(wealth) Reader
Author(s):

Karen Levenback

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780989082679.003.0024

This chapter explores the common wealth in what Woolf once called the “commonwealth of the future.” It suggests not only how current archival practices are used in preserving unique and enduring records, but also how access to these records enhances our reading of Woolf and informs the history of Woolf Studies, which is central to the “mandate” of the International Virginia Woolf Society. The chapter shows that our common wealth is based on memory—as a foundation of history—and that it may be found in the IVWS International Virginia Woolf Society Archive, which is housed at the E. J. Pratt Library, Victoria University, University of Toronto, and, particularly, in the “oral history” recorded by founding members of the Virginia Woolf Society on 31 July 1993.

Keywords:   Virginia Woolf, common wealth, commonwealth, International Virginia Woolf Society, E. J. Pratt Library, University of Toronto, archival practices, archives

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