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Virginia Woolf: Writing the World$
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Pamela L. Caughie and Diana L. Swanson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780990895800

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9780990895800.001.0001

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date: 21 August 2018

Virginia Woolf, Composition Theorist: How Imagined Audiences Can Wreck a Writer

Virginia Woolf, Composition Theorist: How Imagined Audiences Can Wreck a Writer

Chapter:
(p.197) Virginia Woolf, Composition Theorist: How Imagined Audiences Can Wreck a Writer
Source:
Virginia Woolf: Writing the World
Author(s):

Kelle Sills Mullineaux

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9780990895800.003.0028

In regard to Virginia Woolf’s merit as a composition theorist and her conception of imagined audiences, this essay offers three arguments. First, Woolf foresaw many of the concerns about imagined audience that would eventually interest modern composition theorists. Second, Woolf’s conceptualization of the writer’s relationship to audience is revealed through study of both her fiction and nonfiction. Finally, the writer/audience relationship that Woolf illuminates is helpful for teaching students and complements the goals of composition as a field. This essay uses the following Woolf texts to engage these arguments: Between the Acts, Jacob’s Room, “Professions for Women,” A Room of One’s Own, To the Lighthouse, The Waves, “Women and Fiction,” and A Writer’s Diary.

Keywords:   Virginia Woolf, Imagined audience, Composition theorist, Professions for Women, A Room of One’s Own, To the Lighthouse, Mrs Dalloway

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