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The Roman HannibalRemembering the Enemy in Silius Italicus' Punica$
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Claire Stocks

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781781380284

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781380284.001.0001

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date: 20 October 2017

The Roman Hannibal Defined

The Roman Hannibal Defined

Chapter:
(p.6) Chapter One The Roman Hannibal Defined
Source:
The Roman Hannibal
Author(s):

Claire Stocks

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781380284.003.0002

This chapter explores three central concepts. Firstly, the power of the name (nomen)in antiquity with consideration of how potent names such as ‘Hannibal’, ‘Caesar’, and ‘Medea’ stood as symbols for an individual's identity. In particular the name ‘Hannibal’ became associated with cruelty, treachery, and fear. Secondly, this chapter deals with the issue of what is meant by the phrase ‘The Roman Hannibal’, arguing that the Hannibal we know is predominantly the product of Rome's literature and was used by Rome as a means of exploring and interpreting its past. Finally this chapter discusses the positive connotations attached to the Latin word uir (man) and the ideal of Roman manliness as presented in ancient texts, including the Punica.

Keywords:   name, nomen, uir, uiri, Roman Hannibal, manliness

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