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The Roman HannibalRemembering the Enemy in Silius Italicus' Punica$
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Claire Stocks

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781781380284

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781380284.001.0001

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date: 23 October 2017

Silius' Roman Hannibal

Silius' Roman Hannibal

Chapter:
(p.80) Chapter Five Silius' Roman Hannibal
Source:
The Roman Hannibal
Author(s):

Claire Stocks

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781380284.003.0006

In this chapter the focus shifts to close textual readings of the Punica. Beginning with a discussion of Hannibal's early life and career in the Punica, this chapter discusses the three main influences on Silius’ Hannibal: his father Hamilcar, the goddess Juno, and Dido. Of these three, Hannibal, who for the most part remains unaware of the machinations of Juno, only acknowledges the influence of Dido and Hamilcar. It is argued that Hannibal's association with Dido casts him in the role of her Virgilian avenger, whose arrival is foretold by Virgil's Dido in the Aeneid. Meanwhile the influence of his father Hamilcar – both in life and in death – ensures that Hannibal's campaign is presented as a Barcid quest for revenge where ‘hatred for Rome’ becomes a mantle that is passed from father to son.

Keywords:   Hamilcar, Dido, Juno, avenger, Barcid, anger

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