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The Winter of DiscontentMyth, Memory, and History$
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Tara Martin López

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781781380291

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781380291.001.0001

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date: 23 October 2017

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.205) Conclusion
Source:
The Winter of Discontent
Author(s):

Tara Martin López

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781380291.003.0010

The chapter underlines key conclusions of the overall text. In particular, the division between private and public sector trade unions, the influx of women and black and Asian workers into the workforce and British trade unions, gendered and racialized forms of politicization, and the political divisions within the Labour Party are all emphasized as crucial to the overall understanding of the complexity of what occurred in the 1978-79. The chapter then outlines the Labour and Conservative Party’s successful political moves and missteps at this time. The chapter then ends by examining the legacy of the Winter of Discontent, not only in the popular memory of 21st Century Britain, but in the changes the labour movement embraced by empowering women, Black, and Asians members. Finally, the chapter gains insight from Winter of Discontent participants Tom McNally and Betty Hughes where they not only evaluate the significance of the myth of the Winter of Discontent today in Britain, but they worryingly consider its effects on political, gender, racial, and class equality in the future.

Keywords:   Winter of Discontent, British trade unions, politics, gender, race, Labour Party, Conservative Party, Britain

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