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Francophone Afropean Literatures$
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Nicki Hitchcott and Dominic Thomas

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781781380345

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781380345.001.0001

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date: 16 December 2017

Afropeanism and Francophone Sub-Saharan African Writing

Afropeanism and Francophone Sub-Saharan African Writing

Chapter:
(p.17) Afropeanism and Francophone Sub-Saharan African Writing
Source:
Francophone Afropean Literatures
Author(s):

Dominic Thomas

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781380345.003.0002

Contemporary debates and policy initiatives pertaining to ethnic minorities, immigrants, race relations, and “European” identity are inextricably connected to a much longer European colonial history. What are the implications of exploring definitions of race, gender, religion, identity, and Europeanization today in a pan-E.U. framework? Discussions of European identity have highlighted the growing awareness that Europe itself does not correspond to a homogenous entity, yet also yielded two opposing models for defining identity that contrasts the inclusionary with the exclusionary, and insiders with outsiders. How then can one begin to establish Afropean identity as a constitutive historical formation when for some, being European means precisely not being African? Writers such as Léonora Miano, Fatou Diome, and Khadi Hane have engaged, in recent works, with the “transnational” nature of these questions, complicating and exploring the formation of diasporic networks in and between Africa and Europe.

Keywords:   European Union, European identity, race, gender, Afropean literature

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