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Crisis, Credibility and Corporate History$
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Alexander Bieri

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781781381373

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781381373.001.0001

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date: 20 October 2017

Archives and Collections in the Twenty-First Century:

Archives and Collections in the Twenty-First Century:

From Drab to Sexy

Chapter:
(p.99) Archives and Collections in the Twenty-First Century
Source:
Crisis, Credibility and Corporate History
Author(s):

Alexander L. Bieri

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781381373.003.0010

If the 19th Century was about technological advances, the 20th Century was one during which a societal upheaval started whose effects remain unforeseeable. Most of humanity’s important inventions were conceived in the 19th Century, but this was a reactionary time in terms of societal change, seeing the reintroduction of a French monarchy, Victorianism in Britain, and Biedermeier in Germany. Eventually, society followed the 20th Century’s technological advances, with much resulting brutality. Cataclysmic changes during the past century still influence society today and are accelerated by new communication forms. Nevertheless, most of our institutions were established by the 19th Century, in which society was still a Ständegesellschaft (estate-based), having emerged from feudalism. These changes have especially powerful effects on museology, collections, and archives – especially those of private corporations. This article aims to give insight into the route archives can take to meet tomorrow’s demands. It also explains why archives are of growing importance, especially for young people.

Keywords:   museology, collections, archives, societal change, 19th Century, 20th Century

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