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Newspapers and NewsmakersThe Dublin Nationalist Press in the Mid-Nineteenth Century$
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Ann Andrews

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781781381427

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781381427.001.0001

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date: 13 December 2017

The role of the Dublin nationalist press in events leading to the downfall of the Irish nationalist movement in 1848

The role of the Dublin nationalist press in events leading to the downfall of the Irish nationalist movement in 1848

Chapter:
(p.75) Chapter 2 The role of the Dublin nationalist press in events leading to the downfall of the Irish nationalist movement in 1848
Source:
Newspapers and Newsmakers
Author(s):

Ann Andrews

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781381427.003.0002

Concentrating on the causes and consequences of disunity within the Irish nationalist movement from the end of 1843, this chapter examines the destructive power of the Dublin nationalist press. It shows how The Nation’s success imbued its writers with such confidence they could not resist challenging Daniel O’Connell, causing a split in the Repeal Association. When the breakaway Young Irelanders formed the Irish Confederation, John Mitchel, The Nation’s chief writer, reacted angrily to the government’s management of the Great Famine by adopting an editorial policy in opposition to its proprietor, a disagreement that drove him to establish his own newspaper and resign from the Irish Confederation’s Council. Advocating physical force and republicanism, this chapter describes how Mitchel inspired a dedicated following of newspaper activists whose impassioned rhetoric brought an assault upon them by the government, leading to the 1848 rebellion and the collapse of the Irish nationalist movement.

Keywords:   The Nation, Daniel O’Connell, Repeal Association, Young Irelanders, Irish Confederation, famine, newspaper activists, John Mitchel

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