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Surrealism, Science Fiction and Comics$
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Gavin Parkinson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781781381434

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781381434.001.0001

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date: 13 December 2017

A Fantastic Voyage: Mapping Salvador Dalí’s Science Fiction World of Tomorrow

A Fantastic Voyage: Mapping Salvador Dalí’s Science Fiction World of Tomorrow

Chapter:
(p.194) 9. A Fantastic Voyage: Mapping Salvador Dalí’s Science Fiction World of Tomorrow
Source:
Surrealism, Science Fiction and Comics
Author(s):

Julia Pine

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781381434.003.0010

This chapter maps a journey into the history and nature of Salvador Dalí’s involvement with science fiction and ‘futurism’ (the pseudo-science, not the avant-garde movement). It proposes that Dalí used these as a locus for engaging with, and critiquing, mass culture, as well as encouraging an interdisciplinary approach to art, SF and popular culture. Beginning with Dalí’s introduction to America’s fascination with things futuristic and the so-called Atomic and Space Ages, this exploration traces his most notable pseudo-scientific activities and fictive projects throughout his later career, and positions Dali as an agent for mobilizing cultural satire and broadening the boundaries of then-contemporary art. The period in question begins in the late 1930s, when he left the Surrealist movement, and culminates in what was perhaps his most satirical and revealing project in this vein, as well as the least known and most poorly documented; that is, his flamboyant promotional program for the 1966 Twentieth Century Fox SF film Fantastic Voyage, recorded by New York documentarians David and Albert Maysles.

Keywords:   Dali fantastic voyage film futurity

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