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On the EdgeWriting the Border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic$
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Maria Cristina Fumagalli

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781781381601

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781381601.001.0001

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date: 23 October 2017

Conclusion

Conclusion

The rejection of futures past: on the edge of an attainable acceptable future?

Chapter:
(p.381) Conclusion
Source:
On the Edge
Author(s):

Maria Cristina Fumagalli

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781381601.003.0013

This book concludes with a discussion of Manifisto (2013), a video-performance by the Dominican artist Polibio Díaz. Manifisto is a social commentary on the issue of Haitian immigration in the Dominican Republic, highlighting the systematic discrimination that ‘an underclass non-citizen’ has to endure due to ‘the institutional policy of the Junta Central Electoral’. It shows the importance of a birth certificate in the Dominican Republic in terms of name, nationality, citizenship, and access to health care and education, among other rights and privileges. Díaz also tackles the continuities and correspondences between Haiti and the Dominican Republic on one hand, and between the demonised borderland and the urban capital, on the other. The book also examines various responses to the Dominican Constitutional Court's ruling on citizenship and reiterates its position that the road towards a better Hispaniola requires engaging fully with the present and accepting the idea that an acceptable future can be attained.

Keywords:   immigration, Manifisto, Polibio Díaz, Haiti, Dominican Republic, discrimination, birth certificate, citizenship, borderland, Hispaniola

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