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Tropics of HaitiRace and the Literary History of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World, 1789-1865$
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Marlene L. Daut

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781781381847

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781381847.001.0001

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date: 11 December 2018

The Color of History: The Transatlantic Abolitionist Movement and the ‘Never-to-be-Forgiven Course of the Mulattoes’

The Color of History: The Transatlantic Abolitionist Movement and the ‘Never-to-be-Forgiven Course of the Mulattoes’

Chapter:
(p.474) Chapter Ten The Color of History: The Transatlantic Abolitionist Movement and the ‘Never-to-be-Forgiven Course of the Mulattoes’
Source:
Tropics of Haiti
Author(s):

Marlene L. Daut

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781381847.003.0011

This chapter looks at the way in which David Nicholls’s vocabulary about the ‘mulatto legend’ was almost entirely derived from that of nineteenth-century transatlantic abolitionist writing about Haiti, where the idea was first proffered that history itself could have a “color” or a “race.” Beginning with John Beard’s biography of Louverture and its representative status in the transatlantic print culture of the Haitian Revolution, the author examines the influence of this text on the American abolitionists William Wells Brown and James Redpath. The author then undertakes what is the first systematic examination of Beard’s, and later C.L.R. James’s, claims that the Haitian historian Joseph Saint-Rémy was a biased “mulatto” historian whose account of Louverture’s life should be entirely dismissed

Keywords:   Beard, Saint-Rémy, C.L.R. James, Haitian Revolution, Historiography, Racism, Wells Brown, Redpath, Nicholls, Slavery, Abolition, Louverture

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