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Anarchy: War and Status in 12th-Century Landscapes of Conflict$
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Oliver Creighton and Duncan Wright

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781781382424

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781382424.001.0001

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date: 22 January 2018

Waging War: Fields of Conflict and Siege Warfare

Waging War: Fields of Conflict and Siege Warfare

Chapter:
(p.34) Chapter 3 Waging War: Fields of Conflict and Siege Warfare
Source:
Anarchy: War and Status in 12th-Century Landscapes of Conflict
Author(s):

Oliver H. Creighton

Duncan W. Wright

Michael Fradley

Steven Trick

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781382424.003.0003

This chapter provides an overview of how and with what consequences warfare was waged in the twelfth century, drawing particular attention to the landscape context of conflict. Case studies of the period’s two major pitched battles (Northallerton/the Battle of the Standard, 1138, and Lincoln, 1141) are presented, although the conflict as a whole saw few pitched battles and was instead dominated by siege warfare. The period saw the siege castle cemented as an essential part of the repertoire of Anglo-Norman conflict, mixing psychological and martial functions and favoured by rulers in an era when siege warfare was static and protracted while leaders needed to be mobile. The overall picture is that the conflict saw no radical departure in ways of waging war, and many of its characteristic features — such as the use of mercenaries, the avoidance of pitched battle, devastation of landscapes and the predominance of sieges — were not aberrations but part and parcel of an established pattern of Anglo-Norman warfare.

Keywords:   battlefield, conflict, border, Lincoln, mercenary, Northallerton, Scots, siege, siege castle, Wallingford

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