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Dangerous Creole Liaisons$
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Jacqueline Couti

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781781383018

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781383018.001.0001

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date: 21 November 2017

Heritage and Legacies

Heritage and Legacies

Chapter:
(p.217) Coda II Heritage and Legacies
Source:
Dangerous Creole Liaisons
Author(s):

Jacqueline Couti

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781383018.003.0007

This short chapter explains that while the objectives of béké writers frequently differ from those of black authors, their visions of femininity and female bodies, and the national implications of those visions, mirror each other. Hence, these two groups—in dialogue with France—share a similar logic that brings them together, although their political stances differ. However, unlike people of color, white Creoles do not have to prove their humanity and their ability to be good citizens. Both ethno-classes obsess over the problem of recognition and subjectivity: one group strives to remind the metropole of its worth and keep its privilege; the other seeks to demonstrate its own value and ability to become a true French citizen, not a second–class one. For some black Antilleans, then, scores have yet to be settled.

Keywords:   racial tension, anticolonialism, identity construction, race gender

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