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Tartan Gangs and ParamilitariesThe Loyalist Backlash$
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Gareth Mulvenna

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781781383261

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781383261.001.0001

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date: 14 December 2018

Protestants at War? (1971–72)

Protestants at War? (1971–72)

Chapter:
(p.107) 4 Protestants at War? (1971–72)
Source:
Tartan Gangs and Paramilitaries
Author(s):

Gareth Mulvenna

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781383261.003.0005

Chapter Four continues from the second half of 1971, highlighting the increasing fear among journalists and politicians that the Tartan gangs were more than mere hooligans. As violence increased, the Tartans began to receive growing support among the adult population in Protestant working-class communities. In this chapter the oral histories describe the first experimentations by many of the young loyalists in paramilitary activity in late 1971 and early 1972 and how the loyalist paramilitary response related to the perceived defence of Protestant working-class communities.

Keywords:   Loyalism, Paramilitarism, Tartan gangs, Political violence, Terrorism

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