Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Plato's Atlantis StoryText, Translation and Commentary$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christopher Gill

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781786940162

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781786940162.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 20 November 2018

Critias 106–121

Critias 106–121

Chapter:
(p.127) Critias 106–121
Source:
Plato's Atlantis Story
Author(s):

Christopher Gill

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781786940162.003.0006

After Timaeus’s vast, and intellectually impressive, account of the origin of the universe, Critias suggests that his task is more difficult because people are more searching critics of material they know well, and so it is harder to give a convincing picture of human action than of the nature of the universe. This is a surprising claim, given the very demanding nature of Timaeus’s subject matter (which Critias ignores). Also, Critias’s description of his task recalls features of poetic representation criticized in the ...

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.