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From Christianity to JudaismStory of Isaac Orobio de Castro$
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Yosef Kaplan

Print publication date: 1989

Print ISBN-13: 9780197100608

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9780197100608.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 24 September 2021

Building a Career in Andalusia

Building a Career in Andalusia

Chapter:
(p.64) 3 Building a Career in Andalusia
Source:
From Christianity to Judaism
Author(s):

Yosef Kaplan

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9780197100608.003.0003

This chapter details how Baltazar Alvares became a professor at the University of Seville, presumably without producing evidence of any formal degree in medicine. Conceivably, Baltazar presented a forged certificate or perhaps he had succeeded in procuring some document from the University of Osuna, where he had taken the first steps in his specialization in his chosen subject. Whatever the facts, Baltazar got his appointment mainly because the heads of the university had been stymied in their search for another candidate; and they consequently did not examine his credentials too closely. After two years, Baltazar voluntarily relinquished his chair at Seville. At this time, he was retained as personal physician by Don Antonio Juan Luis de Cerda, Duke of Medinaceli. In 1653 — some ten years after resigning his chair at Seville — Baltazar published there a medical treatise written in Latin. This tract was composed in the very midst of a controversy regarding the appropriate part of the body to which bleeding should, when necessary, be applied. Bleeding was an extremely common form of medical treatment in Europe in the Middle Ages, being practised in various ways — by phlebotomy proper, by the application of leeches, or by scoring of the skin.

Keywords:   Baltazar Alvares, University of Seville, medicine, Duke of Medinaceli, medical treatise, bleeding, phlebotomy, physician, professor

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