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Cicero: On Fate& Boethius: The Consolation of Philosophy IV.5-7 and V$
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Print publication date: 1992

Print ISBN-13: 9780856684760

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9780856684760.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 31 July 2021

M. Tulli Ciceronis

M. Tulli Ciceronis

De Fato

Chapter:
(p.52) M. Tulli Ciceronis
Source:
Cicero: On Fate
Author(s):
R. W. Sharples
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9780856684760.003.0002

This chapter provides the text and translation of Cicero's On Fate (De fato), which begins with the criticism of Posidonius and Chrysippus on universal causal sympathy. It describes Chrysippus as a determinist who must accept Diodorus' view that only what actually happens is possible. It also discusses the truth of future-tense statements that do not involve the predicted events' being predetermined and the denial of determinism that does not require the uncaused motion of the Epicurean atomic swerve or the denial of the truth of future-tense statements. The chapter covers Chrysippus' answer to the fatalism of the Lazy Argument, which is considered insufficiently radical as there are events which are not predetermined in advance. It ends with Chrysippus' position regarding sense impressions as necessary initiating causes of action.

Keywords:   Cicero, On Fate, De fato, Chrysippus, Diodorus, Epicurean atomic swerve, Lazy Argument

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