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Augustine: De Civitate Dei The City of God Books I and XII$
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Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780856687525

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9780856687525.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 28 November 2021

Text and Translation of Book II

Text and Translation of Book II

Chapter:
(p.100) Text and Translation of Book II
Source:
Augustine: De Civitate Dei The City of God Books I and XII
Author(s):
P. G. Walsh, P. G. Walsh, P. G. Walsh, P. G. Walsh, P. G. Walsh, P. G. Walsh
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9780856687525.003.0003

This chapter provides the original text and translation of the Book II of Augustine's City of God. It assesses the progressive corruption that has disfigured the Roman state through the wiles of the demons. It also talks about Augustine's mention of Roman historians Sallust and Livy, who acknowledge and deplore moral degeneration. The chapter refers to Cicero's De republica, which documents the differing attitudes shown by Greeks and Romans towards the portrayal of contemporary politicians on the stage. It discusses Augustine's indictment of the Romans for venerating their politicians more highly than their deities, but he also praises them for disenfranchising their actors, whereas the Greeks loaded their actors portraying politicians with civic honours.

Keywords:   Augustine, City of God, Book II, Roman state, Sallust, Livy, Cicero, De republica, contemporary politicians

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