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Anti-Empire: Decolonial Interventions in Lusophone Literatures$
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Daniel F. Silva

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781786941008

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781786941008.001.0001

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Decolonizing Hybridity through Intersectionality and Diaspora in the Poetry of Olinda Beja

Decolonizing Hybridity through Intersectionality and Diaspora in the Poetry of Olinda Beja

Chapter:
(p.237) Chapter Seven Decolonizing Hybridity through Intersectionality and Diaspora in the Poetry of Olinda Beja
Source:
Anti-Empire: Decolonial Interventions in Lusophone Literatures
Author(s):

Daniel F. Silva

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781786941008.003.0008

This chapter considers how Beja, born in 1946 in the African archipelago of São Tomé and Príncipe, seeks to produce a signifying chain that emerges from the centuries-long impact of imperial power on the world, particularly on disenfranchised peoples and spaces. Beja, in this sense, takes a further step by reflecting on ways to enunciate identity and collective struggle in a decolonial fashion. The chapter reads select poems from three of her collections spanning her poetic trajectory and oeuvre: Bô Tendê? [Do You Understand?] (1992), No País do Tchiloli [In the Country of Tchiloli] (1996), and Aromas de Cajamanga [Aromas of Ambarella] (2009). In doing so, we shall examine what we may call a decolonial remapping; one that Beja carries out, I argue, in a poetic narrating/signifying of movement through time and space that re-orders imperial signifiers.

Keywords:   Olinda Beja, São Tomé e Príncipe, Postcolonial Poetry, Decolonial culture, Intersectionality

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