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Anti-Empire: Decolonial Interventions in Lusophone Literatures$

Daniel F. Silva

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781786941008

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781786941008.001.0001

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(p.301) Index

(p.301) Index

Source:
Anti-Empire: Decolonial Interventions in Lusophone Literatures
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
Abraham, Nicholas 29, 180, 188
adultery 273, 277–78
Africans
Lusophone African nations 173–74, 175, 182
in Macunaíma 43, 46–47, 70, 72, 75
slave trade of 3, 4, 20, 41, 85
Afro-Brazilianness 46, 47, 71, 97
allegorical movement, of Macunaíma 70–75
allegory
Antropofagia relating to 34
Benjamin on 48–49, 51
cannibal 25, 49, 50
consumption, repetition, and 65–68
with ‘Manifesto Antropófago’ 35, 36, 43, 44, 45, 48, 49, 50, 51, 53
against totality 47–54
Amadeu, in O Esplendor de Portugal 216–18, 220–22
America’s Shadow (Spanos) 6
Amerindian 43, 46–47, 70, 72, 75, 101
Andanças de um Timorense [‘Wanderings of a Timorese’] (Pedrinha) 145
Andrade, Mário de 24, 25, 86, 88, 287
anthropophagic period of 69
consumption and postcoloniality relating to 33–37, 38, 42, 43, 44
plagiarism relating to 15, 52–54 see also Macunaíma
Andrade, Oswald de 24–25, 46, 194, 287
Anthropophagia and Macunaíma relating to 69, 71, 77–78, 82, 89, 104
consumption and postcoloniality relating to 33–37, 43, 47–54
Angola under the Portuguese (Bender) 121
Anta 14, 98
anthropological works, in East Timor 108–11
Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View (Kant) 90
Anthropophagia and Macunaíma, Andrade, Oswald de relating to 69, 71, 77–78, 82, 89, 104
anthropophagic logic, of cannibal metaphor 35, 69
anthropophagic movement 46, 47, 69, 70, 83, 92, 95
anthropophagic period, of Andrade, Mário de 69
anthropophagic project 78, 87, 91, 93, 96
anthropophagic scene of consumption 25
café relating to 82–83, 95
‘Carta prás Icamiabas’ relating to 79–82
coffee relating to 82–83
commodities with 81–82
decolonial scene of writing with 79, 85, 91, 94, 170–71
elites relating to 82
anthropophagic scene of writing 87, 89, 91, 92
anthropophagic voice 37, 45, 49, 52, 63–66, 68 (p.302)
anthropophagic works 34, 35, 43, 64, 68
anthropophagy 14
anthropos 80–81
anticapitalist cultural movements 24
anti-colonial cultural movements 24, 89
‘Anti-Herói’ [‘Anti-Hero’] 19–20
anti-imperial culture 5, 8
anti-imperial political stances, movement of 87–89
Antropofagia 14, 15, 26, 101, 104
allegory relating to 34
bourgeois project of 34–40
cannibal metaphor relating to 25, 34–35, 39, 43, 63, 64, 84, 93, 94, 95, 98
counter-historicist project of 80
decolonial voice with 45, 67, 89
discourse on 45, 54
in Empire 33–37
failure and logocentrism with 86–89
History and 44–49, 53, 54
Jáuregui on 33
Kantian transcendental philosophy relating to 90–91
language associated with 87–88
Macunaíma in archive of 69–70
movement of 71–77, 95
national identity reformulated with 43–47, 51, 62
primitivism with 38–39
Vargas on 34 see also ‘Manifesto Antropófago’
Antropofagistas 37, 42, 43
Antunes, António Lobo 29, 173–74, 208, 209–32, 235, 288
oeuvre of 30, 209, 231
Anzaldúa, Gloria 251
Apontamentos para um diccionário chorographico de Timor [‘Notes for a Chorographic Dictionary of Timor’] (das Dores) 107
archetypal foundational, in Pau Brasil 51, 54, 64, 66, 67
Arendt, Hannah 186, 187, 190
Aromas de Cajamanga [Aromas of Ambarella] (Beja) 31, 258, 260, 263
Aromas of Ambarella see Aromas de Cajamanga
Arouca, Manuel 174, 175–76
‘Arte de Amar Portugal’ (Sylvan) 117
Associação Social Democrática Timorense [Timorese Social Democratic Association] 128
‘The Ballot or the Bullet’ (Malcom X) 124
being-for-Empire 224
Beja, Olinda 30
on borders 258–63, 289
oeuvre of 31, 237, 245, 260
poetry of 31, 251–58, 260–61, 263, 288
rainbow imagery of 261
sign-system of 262, 263 see also ‘Visão’
Bender, Gerald 121
Benjamin, Walter 48–49, 51
Bhabba, Homi K. 34–35, 51–53, 66–68, 78, 136, 142, 289
on hybridity 247–49, 247n2, 251
Biard, François-Auguste 41, 42
big Other 84, 159–60, 164, 166, 235, 254, 272
The Black Atlantic (Gilroy) 144
Black Brazilian Front see Frente Negra Brasileira
black natives 191
blackness 46–47, 62, 97, 104, 274
crime of 193
imperial articulation of 242
in ‘Visão’ 240–50
Black Skin, White Masks (Fanon) 11, 242–43
‘The Blacks of Pousaflores’ see Os Pretos de Pousaflores
Boaventura, Maria Eugenia 73–74
Bodies That Matter (Butler) 284
‘body-institution,’ of Sylvan 118
Bopp, Raul 71, 99, 101
Bô Tendê? [‘Do you Understand?’] (Beja) 31, 237–45, 263 (p.303)
bourgeois 82, 85, 220
of Antropofagia project 34–40
European 37, 39–40
Braga, Paulo 108–09, 112–13
Brah, Avtar 248
Brazil
colonial and postcolonial history of 34–36, 38, 70, 72, 76, 99, 287
as colony and nation-state 4
global economic power of 4
independence of 33
industrialization in 4, 14
inequities in 85
languages of 33
metropolitan city life of 42
nation-sign of 4, 43–44, 46, 62, 62n1, 87, 92, 98, 101, 104, 105
Portuguese colonialism of 1, 4
primitivism relating to 39
slavery in 4 see also Pau Brasil
Brazilian-Brazil 43, 71, 80, 94, 97
Brazilian identity 75
Brazilian Integralism see Integralismo
Brazilian modernism 88, 104
Brazilian Modernismo 97
Brazilian Natives 41
Brazilianness
Empire and 68
multiracial vision of 95–96, 102–04
Brazilian Western historicization 55
‘Brazilwood’ see Pau Brasil
Butler, Judith 283–84
Caderno de Memórias Coloniais (Figueiredo) 28–29, 173, 174–75, 208, 218
café 82–83, 95
Caiúru (Ribeiro) 111
Caminha, Pero Vaz de 2, 23, 179
Camões, Luís Vaz de 132
Cândido, Antônio 35, 36
cannibal allegory 25, 49, 50
cannibal genealogy 78, 94
‘Cannibal Manifesto’ see ‘Manifesto Antropófago’
cannibal metaphor, Antropofagia relating to 39, 43, 64, 94, 95, 98
anthropophagic logic of 35, 69
meanings of 63, 84, 93
movement of 25, 34
A Canon of Empty Fathers (Rothwell) 181
‘Can the Subaltern Speak?’ (Spivak) 271–72
Cantogrito Maubere (Sylvan) 142–43
capitalism 78
global 8, 14, 89
late 2, 3, 9, 11, 13, 23, 106
slave-based 2, 4
Cardoso, Dulce Mario 174
Cardoso, Luís 27–28, 289
background of 145–46
Empire relating to 145, 148, 149
historicization in 145, 148, 149
oeuvre of 27, 147, 148, 288
Olhos de Coruja Olhos de Gato Bravo by 148
Tetun-Prasa spoken by 145–46
A Última Morte do Coronel Santiago by 148
untranslatable subalternity with 145 see also Requiem para o Navegador Solitário
Carlos
in O Esplendor de Portugal 210–18, 221–25, 227–28, 230, 232, 235
spectral, specular and 221–25
Carta do Achamento do Brasil [Letter on the Discovery of Brazil] (Caminha) 2, 179
‘Carta prás Icamiabas’ [‘Letter to the Icamiabas’] 79–82, 87, 89, 94
Cartesian dictum of Reason 135
Casa Grande e Senzala [The Masters and the Slaves] (Freyre) 59, 72, 102, 103
Catarina
as commodity 157–58, 163
Empire ensnarement of 149–56, 158
enjoyment explored by 160
Gerbault and 167–68
historicization of 152–60
inter-imperial desires of 152
Mati Hari and 169–70
Monteiro and 149–58, 162, 163, 171
as nona 155
Pereira and 156–63, 165
Prince Charming and 154–55 (p.304)
rape of 28, 149, 154, 155, 171
Requiem para o Navegador Solitário narrated by 149–56, 167–72
Semedo and 168–69
cemetery 228–31
centerless scene of writing 135
centrality 142
fantasies of 134
metropolitan 16
phantasmatic 126, 127, 134
Chow, Rey 248
Christianity 267
Chronica do Descobrimento e Conquista da Guiné [Chronicle of the Discovery and Conquest of Guinea] (Zurara) 2
cisgendered white women 178, 191
‘civilização-padrão’ 123–24
Clarisse, in O Esplendor de Portugal 210, 211, 214, 217
Cobra Norato (Bopp) 71, 99
coffee consumption 82–83
collective identities 137
colonial and postcolonial history, of Brazil 34–36, 38, 70, 72, 76, 99, 287
colonial desire 178
Colonial Desire (Young) 247–48
colonial discourse 47, 75, 121, 191, 206–10
cultural, on Antropofagia 45, 54
on otherness 10, 14, 79, 90, 97, 102, 139, 173, 189
of race 223, 247
on whiteness 212, 213
colonial expansion, European 6, 11
colonial field, of meaning 179, 202, 213, 217, 222–25, 228
colonial gatherings, in O Esplendor de Portugal 224–25
colonial historicization, in East Timor 111
colonialism 10, 181, 183, 209
European 39–40
experience of 69
father as 181, 185
patriarchies with 5, 85–86, 201
of Portugal 1, 4
racial signifiers of 213, 249
Sylvan on 125, 127, 136
coloniality 36
definition of 10
global 72
of power 3–4, 8–9, 10, 72, 213, 221
coloniality/decoloniality theoretical paradigm 10
‘Coloniality of Power and Subalternity’ (Mignolo) 9
colonial map, of Portugal 16
colonial New World 51
colonial occupation, late capitalism from 9
colonial past experience, of Figueiredo 180–82
colonial presence, Portuguese, in East Timor 107–15, 287
colonial spaces, spectrality and ruins of 227–31, 232
colonial violence 182, 186, 191, 205
colonial whiteness 199
colonial white womanhood
body of 196, 198
ensnarement of 197
Estado Novo relating to 197–98
father and 196–203
paternalism with 196
role of 197–98
colonization 5, 20
colony and nation-state, of Brazil 4
commodities 81–82
Catarina as 157–58, 163
consumption of 161
common experiences, of subalternity 138, 143–44
Communidade Pluri-Racial [‘Pluri-Racial Community’] (Sylvan) 27, 116–28
communism, Sylvan on 125–26
Comunismo e Conceito de Nação em África [‘Communism and the Concept of Nation in Africa’] (Sylvan) 124, 125n3
conceptualizations 90–91
dominant 136
of Empire 3, 6, 10–11
of imperialism 6
Conrad, Joseph 109–10, 115, 131–32
consumption
dominant 82
imperial 74 (p.305)
with otherness 16, 25, 40–41, 45
of primitive 37–42
rearranging of 42–47
repetition, allegory, and 65–68
consumption and postcoloniality, decolonizing of
Andrade, Mário de, relating to 33–37, 38, 42, 43, 44
Andrade, Oswald de, relating to 33–37, 43, 47–54
Antropofagia in Empire 33–37
Pau Brasil 54–65
Coombes, Annie 248
‘Corporal Form’ see ‘Forma Corporal’
cosmopolitanism 39, 42
Crenshaw, Kimberlé Williams 245–46, 251
crime, of blackness 193
Crónica de Uma Travessia – A Época do Ai-Dik-Funam [The Crossing] (Cardosa) 146–47, 148
cryptology see imperial cryptology
crypts 194, 233–36
cemetery and 228–29
colonial past and 180–82
Figueiredo relating to 188–90, 191
of historicization 182–85, 188–90
sepulchral function of 189
cultural commonality, phantasmatic 16
cultural discourse, on Antropofagia 45, 54
cultural movements
anticapitalist 24
anti-colonial 24, 89
of anti-imperial political stances 87–89
culture 42
anti-imperial 5, 8
democratization of 78–79
of East Timor 109
identity of 136–37, 174
Lusophone studies of 17
monoculturalism 15
multiculturalism 95
Os Cus de Judas [South of Nowhere] (Antunes) 30, 208, 209, 236
‘A Cyborg Manifesto’ (Haraway) 285–86
Darker Side of Modernity and Learning to Unlearn (Mignolo and Tlostanova) 13, 231
‘Darkness’ see ‘Escuridão’
das Dores, Raphael 107–08
decolonial delinking, decrepit narratives and 232–35
decolonial identity 133
decoloniality 10, 15, 17, 289
Mignolo on 8, 12–13, 135, 234–35
of postnationalism 21–24
decolonial narrative device for colonial experience, spectrality as 208–10, 221–36
decolonial nationalism 253
decolonial non-imperial modernization 80
decolonial politics 6–16
decolonial potential, of Pau Brasil 63
decolonial scene of writing 79, 85, 91, 94, 170–71
decolonial sign-system, mapping of 257–63
decolonial studies 5, 8, 9, 11, 13, 14, 34
decolonial subjectivity 67
decolonial voice, with Antropofagia 45, 67, 89
decolonization 7, 8, 145
of intercultural meaning 27
of Latin America 287
of Lusophone 16–21
decolonizing hybridity, through
intersectionality and diaspora 237–44
conclusion to 263
decolonial sign-system, mapping of 257–63
double-consciousness from intersection 251–57 (p.306)
subjectivation, intersectionality of 245–50
decolonizing pluri-racial nation, Sylvan on 116–28
deculturation 76
Deixei o Meu Coração em África [‘I Left My Heart in Africa’] (Arouca) 174, 175–76
‘Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex’ (Crenshaw) 245
democracy, racial 18, 72, 100, 102, 102n1, 103–04
democratization, of culture 78–79
Derrida, Jacques 78, 134, 189, 207, 208, 235–36, 265
writings of 11, 27, 29, 78, 134, 185, 188, 203, 284
desire 152, 178, 287
of Empire 101, 162, 254
of Figueiredo 182, 200
of heterosexual male 246–47
of Other 84, 93, 160, 161–62, 165–66, 167
de Sousa Santos, Boaventura 13–14, 16, 20, 111
dialogic epistemes 268–72, 273, 276, 281
Diário de uma Viagem a Timor [‘Journal of a Journey to Timor’] (Tamagnini) 113
Dias Martins, Ann Margarida 260
Dili, in East Timor 106–07, 110, 112–13, 149, 150, 155–56
‘Discoveries’ 121–22, 131, 207
discrimination 245–46
dominant conceptualizations 136
dominant consumption 82
Domingas, Figueiredo relationship with 204–05
double-consciousness 242–43, 251–57
‘Do you Understand?’ see Bô Tendê?
Du Bois, W. E. B. 242, 243, 257–58
‘Earth’ see ‘Terra’
East Timor 3, 20, 21, 22–23, 27–28
das Dores on 107–08
identity of 147
independence of 115–16
Indonesian occupation of 145
literature of 106
as location of Requiem para o Navegador Solitário 149–56
multiethnic population of 106
nonas in 112–13, 155
Portuguese decolonization of 145
economy
of Brazil 4
in Pau Brasil 56, 57–58, 61
ego-ideal 84, 164, 201, 205–06, 272
superego 160–67
elites, of São Paulo 73, 77, 78, 82–83, 86
Empire 1, 130, 130n5
Antropofagia in 33–37
approach to 4, 6–7
Brazilianness and 68
capitalism, patriarchy, and, in ‘Manifesto Antropófago’ 78
Cardoso, Luis, on 145, 148, 149
Catarina ensnared by 149–56, 158
challenging of 11–12
conceptualization of 3, 6, 10–11
consuming of 54–65
desire of 101, 162, 254
excess of 172
experiences of 15–16, 18, 69
field of 162, 168, 264
framework for 7, 8
gaze and surveillance of 133
globality of 138
ideology of 4, 7
intersectionality relating to 5
literary work relating to 6–7, 21
loss of 187–88
patriarchies in 181
philosophical foundations of 15
postcoloniality, decolonial politics, and 6–16
postnation against 135–43
Reason and 89–91
reproduction of 132, 160, 218, 223, 243, 245–46, 287 (p.307)
signifying chain of 5, 34, 44–45, 47, 138, 143, 188, 190, 212–13, 229, 231–32, 257
taxonomies relating to 4–5, 45, 85, 237, 272
textuality of 164
theorization of 36
Empire psychic links, reversing of 83–86
Empire’s masculine subject, interpellation and 167–70
endemoninhados 270
enjoyment 160–67
Enlightenment 10, 36
ensnarement, of colonial white womanhood 197
epistemes, dialogic 268–72, 273, 276, 281
epistemologies 10, 12, 40, 87, 89, 134, 258
Eurocentric 8, 13
of South 14
‘Escuridão’ [‘Darkness’] (Beja) 260–61
O Esplendor de Portugal [The Splendor of Portugal] (Antunes) 29–30, 173–74
Amadeu in 216–18, 220–22
Clarisse in 210, 211, 214, 217
colonial gatherings in 224–25
immobilization relating to 214–15
Lena in 211–13
narrative of 209–14
Rui in 210, 211, 214
spectral composition of 211–21
Estado Novo 34, 96–97, 102, 117, 121, 132
colonial white womanhood relating to 197–98
fall of 173
imperial inscriptions relating to 107, 107n1, 114, 183
Sylvan on 114, 126
ethnic makeup, of East Timor 106, 107, 114–15
ethnic/racial otherness 6, 46, 80, 91, 100, 102, 240
ethnographic works, in East Timor 108–11
Eurocentric epistemologies 8, 13
European bourgeois 37, 39–40
European colonial expansion 6, 11
European cultural forms 42
Europeanization 238–39
European modernisms 88
European national imperial projects 1
European primitivism 39
Europeans, Amerindians, Africans, in Macunaíma 43, 46–47, 70, 72, 75
European supremacy 123–24
exploitation 48, 50, 63, 82–83, 121, 183
Fanon, Frantz 11, 27, 138, 141, 242–53
fantasies
of centrality 134
of otherness 75, 91, 122, 160, 166, 169, 171, 242
of racial and sexual otherness 178–79, 220
of whiteness 189, 246
father
apparition of 195
as colonialism 181, 185
colonial white womanhood and 196–203
contradictions of 183
displacement of 204–05
ideology and 178–80
Name-of-the-Father 178, 192
paternal function/enforcer of 181–82
privileges of 178
sexual liaisons of 196–97
sins of 206–07
specter of 205–07
symbolic function of 178
‘fazenda antiga’ (Andrade, Oswald de) 194
female sexuality 199, 201
Ferreira, Filipe 113
field, of meanings 228, 254, 287
colonial 179, 202, 213, 217, 222–25, 228
of Empire 162, 168, 264 (p.308)
imperial 10, 46, 64, 79, 83–84, 85, 89, 90, 93, 95, 101, 111, 113, 122, 124, 134, 154, 160, 162, 164, 165, 170, 184, 200, 201, 202, 206, 223, 224, 227, 229, 235, 281
of power 161
Figueiredo, Isabela 28–29, 173, 208, 218, 288
background of 174–75
body of 178, 180
colonial past experience of 180–82
crypts relating to 188–90, 191
desire of 152, 200
Domingas relationship with 204–05
interpellation of 179
preadolescent episodes of 199–200, 204–05
sexuality of 177, 178–80, 182, 196–203, 204–05
as white woman 178
‘The Final Death of Colonel Santiago’ see A Última Morte do Coronel Santiago
fin-de-siècle 34, 39, 61
Formacão da Literatura Brasileira [‘Formation of Brazilian Literature’] (Cândido) 35
‘Forma Corporal’ [‘Corporal Form’] (Beja) 255–57
Frente Negra Brasileira [Black Brazilian Front] 97
Freud, Sigmund 63, 161, 162, 166, 273–74
Freyre, Gilberto 59, 63, 72, 100, 102, 103–04, 114–15
gender
class, sexuality, disability, race, and 264–65, 288
masculinity undone and categories of 279–86 see also transgendering, of Jesus
gendered power 280
gendered subjectivation 285
gender insubordination 283–84
genealogy 63, 78, 94
Geography (Kant) 90–91
geopolitics, of knowing and knowledge 80–81
Gerbault, Alain 167–68
Gilroy, Paul 144
global capitalism 8, 14, 89
global coloniality 72
global dependency 37
globality, of Empire 138
global North 235
global practice, of power 7
global subaltern movement 19
gnosis 251, 258
Gomes, Aida 174
Great Depression 95
Hall, Stuart 137, 138, 248
Hallucinated City see Paulicéia Desvairada
Haraway, Donna 285–86
Heart of Darkness (Conrad) 131–32
hegemonic historicity 233
hegemony 6, 11–12, 44, 77, 89–90, 94, 104
heteronormative masculinity 161, 163, 166, 169, 195
heterosexual male desire 246–47
historical narrativization 49, 68
historical primitive 38
historicity, hegemonic 233
historicization 13, 16, 25, 27, 35, 55
of Catarina 152–60
crypts of 182–85, 188–90
in East Timor 111
of events, in ‘Visão’ 242
imperial 164, 184, 246, 286, 287
intersectional 170–71
whiteness and 73
in writings of Cardoso, Luis 145, 148, 149
history
of Brazil 34–36, 38, 70, 72, 76, 99, 287
of East Timor 106
of Portuguese imperialism 3
of West 68
History 209, 234
Antropofagia and 44–49, 53, 54
imperial 73
machine of 71 (p.309)
path of 91
subaltern and 73
homosexual masculinity 164
humanitas 81, 122, 123
humanity, Portuguese imperialism impact on 2
Hybridity and its Discontents (Brah and Coombes) 248
Icamiabas 79
‘Identidade’ (Beja) 251, 253–54, 256, 260
identity
of East Timor 147
identitarian framework 17, 40, 111, 119, 127, 171, 220, 221, 227, 229, 249
metaphoric journey of 133
unfixed 128–35 see also meta-identity; specific identity
ideology 54
of Empire 4, 7
father and 178–80
of rule 49
‘I left My Heart of Africa’ see Deixei o Meu Coração em África
A Ilha dos Homens Nus [‘The Island of Naked Men’] (Braga) 109
imago 241, 246
immobilization 214–15
imperial articulation, of blackness 242
imperial categories, of race 71
imperial consumption 74
imperial cryptonomy 29, 174–77
conclusion to 207
crypts, colonial past and 180–82
father, ideology and 178–80
framework for 188–90
with Lusophone African nations 173
omniscience, of paternal specter 191–96
Portugal contemporary imperial narrative, crypts of historicization and 182–85
specter persistence 205–07
spectrality, imperial public sphere and 185–88, 185n3, 189, 195, 201–03
imperial exploitation and imperial discourses, of racial difference 121
imperial field of meaning see field, of meanings
imperial historicization 164, 184, 246, 286, 287
imperial History 73
imperial inscriptions, of colony and bodies, in East Timor 164
access to 112
of anthropological and ethnographic works 108–11
of colonial historicization 111
of cultural life 109
Estado Novo 107, 107n1, 114, 183
ethnic makeup 107, 114–15
Indonesia relating to 116, 127
influence of 111
linguistic makeup 108, 113–14
occupations relating to 107
Portuguese colonial presence 107–15, 287
of Portuguese orientalist fiction 111
of travelers 107–09
United States relating to 116
imperialism 136
conceptualization of 6
contours of 1
impact of 5
subalternity with 3, 4, 5, 20, 132
Western 1, 3, 6, 7, 10, 44, 50 see also Portuguese imperialism
imperial language 23
imperial masculinity 218
imperial power 1, 40, 225
imperial public sphere, spectrality and 185–88, 185n3, 189, 195, 201–03
imperial subalternity, of Portugal 16
independence
of Brazil 33
of East Timor 115–16
indigeneity 14–15, 45, 74, 76 (p.310)
Indonesia, East Timor relating to 116, 127, 145
industrial city, of São Paulo 62, 82–83, 85
industrialization
in Brazil 4, 14
Portuguese imperialism impact on 2
industrial modernity 81
inscriptions
of jouissance 156–60
Integralismo [Brazilian Integralism] 97
intercultural meaning, decolonization of 27
inter-imperiality 3, 5, 152
interknowledge 15
internationalism, revolutionary 5
International Year for Action to Combat Racism and Racial Prejudice 135
interpellation 118, 206, 219, 235
of Figueiredo 179
interruption of 89–94
with Macunaíma 84
masculinity and 167–70
in ‘Visão’ 240
interracial sex 181, 182, 199, 220–21, 244, 247
intersection, double-consciousness from 251–57
intersectional historicization 170–71
intersectionality 5, 18, 31, 138, 138n6, 254
of imperial exploitation and imperial discourses, of racial difference 121
of subjectivation 245–50
intersubjective life, of Jesus 276–77, 279
‘In the Country of Tchiloli’ see No País do Tchiloli
Isilda
cemetery and 228–31
death of 225–27, 232
in O Esplendor de Portugal 209–11, 214–15, 218–20, 221–32
spectral and specular relating to 221–27
vanishing of 230–31
‘The Island of Naked Men’ see A Ilha dos Homens Nus
Jameson, Fredric 33, 37
Jáuregui, Carlos A. 33
Jesus
dialogic epistemes of 268–72, 273, 276, 281
ego-ideal and 272
reincarnation of 31–32, 266–68, 273, 275, 280, 286
transgendering of 264–67, 280–81, 288
Jesus, as black elderly woman 268
adultery relating to 273, 277–78
endemoninhados and 270
exile of 274–75
intersubjective life of 276–77, 279
masculinity, dark continent and decentering of 273–78
masculinity undone, gender categories and 279–86
multitude and 269–70, 276
reading of 282
‘Sermon on the Mount’ of 273, 275, 277
signification and 274, 285
in tavern 281–83, 284
Third Age of 269–70
jouissance
Lacanian theory of 28, 140–41, 141n7, 160–61, 162, 164, 166, 167, 168–69
writing, resistance, and inscription of 156–60
‘Journal of a Journey to Timor’ see Diário de uma Viagem a Timor
Journal of Portuguese Language 52
journey
of Macunaíma 70–71, 83–86
metaphoric, of identity 133
to São Paulo 26, 79
(p.311)
Kant, Immanuel 90–91
Kantian races 99
knowledge 10
geopolitics of knowing and 80–81
modes of 4, 7, 9, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16
sites of 8, 14, 15
subject of knowledge and 84
Lacan, Jacques 137, 180, 195, 201, 226, 272, 277
father role relating to 178, 192
Lacanian theory
of jouissance 28, 140–41, 141n7, 160–61, 162, 164, 166, 167, 168–69
of other 30, 54, 84, 235, 246
languages
Antropofagia associated with 87–88
of Brazilian nationhood 33
of colloquial Portuguese 54
imperial 23
Marxian 82
Modern European 87
of Portugal 16, 18, 22–23, 87, 128
‘The Last Year in Luanda’ see O Último Ano em Luanda
late capitalism 2, 3, 9, 11, 13, 23, 106
Latin America 9, 10, 14, 287
The Latin American Subaltern Studies Reader 9
Law, Requiem para o Navegador Solitário
associated with 161–62, 163, 164–67, 168, 171–72
laws, of whiteness 181
Lena, in O Esplendor de Portugal 211–13
letter, of Macunaíma 26, 53, 79, 86–87, 93–94, 105
Letter on the Discovery of Brazil see Carta do Achamento do Brasil
‘Letter to the Icamiabas see ‘Carta prás Icamiabas’
The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman and Machado de Assis’s Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (Sterne) 214
Life of Jesus (Renan) 266–67
linguistic makeup, of East Timor 108, 113–14
literacy 128
literature
of East Timor 106
Lusophone 3, 16, 17, 106, 116–17, 246, 287–88
Portuguese 21–24
postcolonial 23–24, 27, 33, 40, 248
Local Histories/Global Designs (Mignolo) 8, 13
logocentrism, Antropofagia failure and 86–89
Lopes, Fernão 2
López, Kimberle 38, 39, 47, 74
Os Lusíadas [The Lusiads] (Camões) 132
O Luso e o Trópico [The Luso and the Tropical] (Freyre) 114–15
Lusofonia 3, 3n1, 5, 16, 18, 23
Lusophone
cultural studies 17
decolonizing of 16–21
inter-imperial 5
literatures relating to 3, 16, 17, 106, 116–17, 246, 287–88
postcolonialism 18, 20–21, 176
Lusophone African nations
formal colonization end with 173
imperial cryptology with 173
political reconstruction of 173
retornados with 173–74, 175, 182
Lusotopia 16
Lusotropicalism 114, 115, 120
claims of 182–83
narratives relating to 117, 119, 121, 171, 175–76, 181, 183, 184
racial democracy and 18, 100
Macunaíma
journey of 70–71, 83–86
letter of 26, 53, 79, 86–87, 93–94, 105
nationalism of 74–75
significational gaze of 70–71, 84
Macunaíma [‘Macunaíma’] (Andrade,
Mário de) 25–26, 48, 101, 105
allegorical movement relating to 70–75
anthropophagic scene of consumption 79–84, 85, 94, 95
within Antropofagia archive 69–70
cannibal genealogy in 78, 94 (p.312)
ego-ideal 84, 164
Europeans, Amerindians, Africans relating to 43, 46–47, 70, 72, 75
interpellation with 84
as multiracial 70–71, 73
plagiarism relating to 15, 52–54
spaces of production, subalternity, privilege of urban terrain 83
spatial movement 71
transculturation renegotiation relating to 75–79
Madureira, Luís 3, 18, 20–21, 44, 99–100, 111
Magalhães, Jaime 174
Malcom X 124, 138
Malisera, in Requiem para o Navegador Solitário 151, 152, 153, 156
‘Manifesto Antropófago’ [‘Cannibal Manifesto’] (Andrade, Oswald de) 25, 55, 67, 72, 77
Afro-Brazilianness and 46, 47, 71, 97
allegory associated with 35, 36, 43, 44, 45, 48, 49, 50, 51, 53
Empire, capitalism, patriarchy 78
‘Manifesto da Poesia Pau-Brasil’ see Pau Brasil
marginalization, with Portuguese colonialism 21
Martim Cererê (Ricardo) 71
Marx, Karl 254
Marxian language 82
Marxist-Leninist state 125
masculine agency, in Requiem para o Navegador Solitário 154, 158
masculine imperial subject-position 166
masculinity 221, 288
Catarina relating to 164
dark continent and decentering of 273–78
enjoyment, imperial superego, and 160–67
heteronormative 161, 163, 166, 169
homosexual 164
imperial 218
imperial field of meaning and 164
interpellation and 167–70
inter-tensions of 163–64
phantasmatic nature of 158, 164, 165
whiteness relating to 177
masculinity undone, gender categories and 279–86
The Masters and the Slaves see Casa Grande e Senzala
Mata, Inocência 252
matrix of domination 245
McMahon, Christina 269
meanings 27, 31
of cannibal metaphor 63, 84, 93 see also field, of meanings
Medea, in ‘Visão’ 239–40
memoir, of Figueiredo 176–80, 183–88, 191–92, 199, 206–07
Mensagem do Terceiro Mundo [Message from the Third World] (Sylvan) 26, 135–43
Mensagen [Message] (Pessoa) 132
Message from the Third World see Mensagem do Terceiro Mundo
metropolitan centrality 16
metropolitan imperial nostalgia 16
metropolitan whiteness 247
la mezcla (Anzaldúa) 251
Mignolo, Walter D. 29, 39, 40, 87, 231, 258
on colonity of power 9–10, 72
on decoloniality 8, 12–13, 135, 234–35
on geopolitics of knowledge and knowing 80–81
‘Minimal Selves’ (Hall) 138
Modern European languages 87
Modernismo movement members 97–98
modernisms 74–75
Brazilian 88, 104
European 88
to multiracial fascism 95–104
modernities 9, 14, 51, 53, 77–78, 80
industrial 81
Western 81, 188
(p.313)
modernization
decolonial non-imperial 80
in Pau Brasil 62, 62n2
monoculturalism 15
monologicism 15
Monteiro, Alberto Sacramento 149–58, 162, 163, 171
Morrison, Toni 218
mourning 186–87, 188
‘O Movimento Modernista’ (Andrade, Mário de) 88
Movimento Nacional Feminino [National Women’s Movement] 197
multicultural ethics, decolonial
meta-identity and 106
conclusion to 143–44
decolonizing pluri-racism nation 116–28
identity unfixed 128–35
imperial inscriptions of colony and bodies 107–16, 127, 164, 183, 287
postnation against Empire 135–43
multiculturalism 95
multiracial, Macunaíma as 70–71, 73
multiracial fascism, modernisms to 95–104
multiracial vision, of Brazilianness 95–96, 102–04
multitude, Jesus and 269–70, 276
O Mundo que o Português Criou [‘The World the Portuguese Created’] (Freyre) 103
Name-of-the-Father 178, 192
narratives 18
decolonial, device, for colonial experience 208–10, 221–36
decolonial delinking and 232–35
of O Esplendor de Portugal 209–14
imperial 50, 67, 182–85
Lusotropicalism 117, 119, 121, 171, 175–76, 181, 183, 184
narrativizations 18, 51, 135
historical 49, 68
imperial 50, 67
Western 50, 72, 79
national geographies, in Pau Brasil 61
national identity reformulation, with Antropofagia 43–47, 51, 62
nationalism 9, 74–75, 76, 136–37, 253
national subjectivity 136
National Women’s Movement see Movimento Nacional Feminino
nation-sign, of Brazil 43–46, 62n1, 87, 92, 98, 101, 104–05
As Naus [The Return of the Caravels] (Antunes) 209
‘Navio’ [‘Vessel’] (Sylvan) 129–30, 133–34
negritude 244
Negro 242
neocolonization 136
The Newest Testament see O Novíssimo Testamento
New World see Novo Mundo
N’Ganga, João Paulo 18–19
Niketche [Niketche] (Dias Martins) 260
A nona do Pinto Brás (Novela Timorense) [Pinto Bras’s Nona (A Timorese Novel)] (Ferreira) 113
nonas, in East Timor 112–13, 155
No País do Tchiloli [‘In the Country of Tchiloli’] (Beja) 31, 251–52, 253, 255, 258, 263
‘Notes for a Chorographic Dictionary of Timor’ see Apontamentos para um diccionário chorographico de Timor
O Novíssimo Testamento [The Newest Testament] (Sousa, Mário Lúcio) 15–16, 31–32, 264–67, 288
plot of 265–73, 285
Novo Mundo [New World] (Figueiredo) 174
Occidentalism 10
oeuvre 47
of Andrade, Oswald de 59
of Antunes 30, 209, 231
of Beja 31, 237, 245, 260
of Cardoso, Luis 27, 147, 148, 288
of Sousa 265
of Sylvan 106, 128, 136, 137
Olhos de Coruja Olhos de Gato Bravo [‘Owl’s Eyes Wild Cat’s Eyes’] (Cardoso, Luis) 148
Orientalism 10, 40 (p.314)
Orientalism (Said) 12, 40
The Origin of German Tragic Drama (Benjamin) 48
Ortiz, Fernando 76–77
other
Lacanian theory of 30, 54, 84, 235, 246
phantasmatic 41, 123, 154, 220
Other 38, 39, 40–41, 92, 133
desire of 84, 93, 160, 161–62, 165–66, 167
otherness 32, 37, 39, 133, 142, 249, 274
colonial discourse on 10, 14, 79, 90, 97, 102, 139, 173, 189
consumption with 16, 25, 40–41, 45
fantasies of 75, 91, 122, 160, 166, 169, 171, 242
messianic figure relating to 268
primitive 42
racial/ethnic 6, 46, 80, 91, 100, 102, 240
‘Owl’s Eyes Wild Cat’s Eyes’ see Olhos de Coruja Olhos de Gato Bravo
particularities, of Portuguese colonialism 17, 20–21
‘Passagem do Testemungo’ (Sylvan) 142–43
paternal function/enforcer, of father 181–82
paternalism, with colonial white womanhood 196
paternal specter, omniscience of 191–96
patriarchies 280
with colonialism 5, 85–86, 201
in Empire 181
in ‘Manifesto Antropófago’ 78
in Pau Brasil 57, 64
in Requiem para o Navegador Solitário 154–58, 161, 162, 171
Pau Brasil [‘Brazilwood’] (Andrade, Oswald de) 25, 35, 47, 48, 50
archetypal foundational in 51, 54, 64, 66, 67
consuming Empire from periphery 54–65
decolonial potential of 63
economy in 56, 57–58, 61
genealogy in 63
national geographies in 61
patriarchy in 57, 64
plagiarism associated with 55–56
racial modernization in 62
as rewrite of Brazilian Western historicization 55
signifying chain associated with 48, 55, 64–65, 68
slave labor in 56–57, 58–61
urban modernization in 62, 62n2
violence in 58–62
Paulicéia Desvairada [Hallucinated City] (Andrade, Mário de) 86
Pedrinha, Ponte 145, 146
Pereira, Geraldo Pinto, in Requiem para o Navegador Solitário 156–63, 165
performativity 284–85
Pessoa, Fernando 132
phantasmatic centrality 126, 127, 134
phantasmatic cultural commonality 16
phantasmatic nature, of masculinity 158, 164, 165
phantasmatic other 41, 123, 154, 220
philosophical foundations, of Empire 15
Pinto Bras’s Nona (A Timorese Novel) see A nona do Pinto Brás (Novela Timorense)
plagiarism
of Andrade, Mário de 15, 52–54
of Andrade, Oswald de 55–56
Playing in the Dark (Morrison) 218
‘Pluri-Racial Community’ see Communidade Pluri-Racial
‘Poemas da Colonização’ (Andrade, Oswald de) 46
political autonomy, Sylvan on 125
political reconstruction, of Lusophone African nations 173
Portugal
early modern explorers of 209
expansion of 1–2
imperial subalternity of 16
language of 16, 18, 22–23, 54, 87, 128
literature of 21–24
orientalist fiction of 111
postcolonial experience of 17 (p.315)
retracing colonial map of 16
women of 199 see also O Esplendor de Portugal
Portugal, contemporary imperial narrative of with disenfranchisement 183, 185
grand narrative 183–84
ground narrative 184
with sports 182–83
Portugal, East Timor and colonialism 107–15, 287
decolonization 145
Portuguese colonialism 121, 127, 171, 199, 208
atrocities of 191
of Brazil 1, 4
in East Timor 107–15, 287
end of 173–77
marginalization with 21
particularities of 17, 20–21
three centuries of 42
Portuguese imperialism 1, 23
collaboration with 3, 4, 4n2
endeavor of 4
framework for 2–3, 5
history of 3
humanity impacted by 2
impact of 3
industrialism impacted by 2
power and privilege of 4, 36, 82, 176
power matrix impacted by 2–3, 20
resistance to 2
slave-based capitalism impacted by 2, 4
postcolonial experience, of Portugal 17
postcolonial inscription 147
postcolonialism, Lusophone 18, 20–21, 176
postcoloniality 37, 137
collective level of 66
cultural critique of 47
decolonial politics, Empire, and 6–16
plight of 50–51
postcolonial literatures 23–24, 27, 33, 40, 248
postcolonial meaning 31
postcolonial metropolitan nation 232, 234
postcolonial nationhood 6, 68, 136
postcolonial renegotiation 255
postcolonial studies 5, 6–8, 9, 11–12, 21
Postcolonial Studies 18
postcolonial theory 11, 13
post-imperial identity 111, 111n2
postnation, against Empire 135–43
postnationalism, decoloniality of 21–24
power 7
of coloniality 3–4, 8–9, 10, 72, 213, 221
dominant narratives of 18
economic, of Brazil 4
field of 161
gendered 280
imperial 1, 40, 225
privilege and 4, 36, 82, 176
to subaltern subjects 36
power matrix, Portuguese imperialism impact on 2–3, 20
preadolescent episodes, of Figueiredo 199–200, 204–05
Preto no branc: (N’Ganga) 18–19
Os Pretos de Pousaflores [‘The Blacks of Pousaflores’] (Gomes) 174
primitive
consumption of 37–42
historical 38
otherness 42
primitivism 35, 37, 40–42, 43
with Antropofagia 38–39
Brazil relating to 39
European 39
Príncipe, 21, 30, 237, 241, 251, 252, 258–59
privilege, power and 4, 36, 82, 176
privileges, of father 178
Quijano, Aníbal 8–9, 9n3
race
colonial discourse of 223, 247
gender, class, sexuality, disability, and 264–65, 288
imperial categories of 71
Kantian 99
‘Race, the Floating Signifier’ (Hall) 248
racial boundary 198 (p.316)
racial class system 192
racial democracy 18, 72, 100, 102, 102n1, 103–04
racial difference, signification of 121, 163, 222
racial identity 174
racialized subjectivity 242
racial modernization, in Pau Brasil 62
racial otherness ethnic and 6, 46, 80, 91, 100, 102, 240
fantasies of sexual and 178–79, 220
racial segregation 198
racial signifiers 213, 249
racism 16, 18, 19, 20, 103
epistemology and 40
European 122
Racismo, opressão dos povos [Racism and the Oppression of Peoples] (Sousa, Vinício de) 19
O Racismo da Europa e a Paz no Mundo [The Racism of Europe and World Peace] (Sylvan) 26–27, 122, 123, 127, 129, 133
Rancière, Jacques 233–34
rape 28, 60, 149, 154, 155, 171, 183
rationalism 89
Real 160
realm, of concepts 89–94
Reason
Cartesian dictum of 135
Empire and 89–91
Rebelo, Tiago 174
reincarnation, of Jesus 31–32, 266–68, 273, 275, 280, 286
Renan, Ernest 266–67
repetition, consumption, allegory 65–68
reproduction, of Empire 132, 160, 218, 223, 243, 245–46, 287
Requiem para o Navegador Solitário [Requiem for the Solitary Sailor] (Cardoso, Luis) 27–28, 145
Catarina as narrator of 149–56, 167–72
East Timor as location of 149–56
Iberian Peninsula in 151, 151n1
jouissance in 156–60
Law associated with 161–62, 163, 164–67, 168, 171–72
Malisera in 151, 152, 153, 156
masculine agency in 154, 158
Monteiro in 149–58, 162, 163, 171
patriarchy in 154–58, 161, 162, 171
Pereira in 156–63, 165
transcontinentalidade in 150
resignification 27, 46–47, 78, 95
retornados 173–74, 175, 182
Os Retornados [‘The Returnees’] (Magalhães) 174
O Retorno [‘The Return’] (Cardoso, Dulce Maria) 174
‘The Returnees’ see Os Retornados
The Return of the Caravels see As Naus
Revista de Antropofagia 44, 46
revolutionary internationalism 5
Ribeiro, Grácio 111
Ricardo, Cassiano 71
‘Rota’ [‘Route’] (Sylvan) 130–31, 133–34
Rothwell, Phillip 181
Rui, in O Esplendor de Portugal 210, 211, 214
Said, Edward 12, 24, 40, 136–37
Salgado, Plínio 26, 71, 97–98, 101
São Paulo 33, 61, 70
elites of 73, 77, 78, 82–83, 86
industrial city of 62, 82–83, 85
journey to 26, 79
‘São Tomé 21, 30–31, 237, 241, 251–52, 255, 258–59
scene of writing 269
anthropophagic 87, 89, 91, 92
centerless 135
decolonial 79, 85, 91, 94, 170–71
Schwartz, Roberto 35–37
Semedo, César 168–69
‘Sermon on the Mount’ 273, 275, 277
7 Poemas de Timor [‘7 Poems of Timor’] (Sylvan) 129, 135
sex, interracial 181, 182, 199, 220–21, 244, 247
sexual and racial otherness, fantasies of 178–79, 220
sexual identities 279
sexuality
female 199, 201, 278–80
of Figueiredo 177, 178–80, 182, 196–203, 204–05 (p.317)
race, gender, class, disability, and 264–65, 288
sexual liaisons, of father 196–97
sexual taxonomies 196
sexual violence 181, 182
‘Signature, Event, Context’ (Derrida) 284
signification 289
Jesus, as black elderly woman, and 274, 285
of racial difference 121, 163, 222
resignification 27, 46–47, 78, 95
of time, space, bodies 237, 287
significational gaze, of Macunaíma 70–71, 84
signifying chain
of Empire 5, 34, 44–45, 47, 138, 143, 188, 190, 212–13, 229, 231–32, 257
Pau Brasil relating to 48, 55, 64–65, 68
sign-systems 12, 13, 24, 257–61
of Beja 262, 263
Silva, Daniel F. 12
sins, of father 206–07
slave-based capitalism 2, 4
slave labor, in Pau Brasil 56–57, 58–61
slavery 4, 57, 83, 103–04, 183, 263
slave trade, African 3, 4, 20, 41, 85
Soares, Anthony 128
The Souls of Black Folk (Du Bois) 258
Sousa, Mário Lúcio 15–16
background of 264–65
oeuvre of 265
Sousa, Vinício de 19
South of Nowhere see Os Cus de Judas
‘Sozinha no Palco (Lusófono)?’ (McMahon) 269
spaces of production, subalternity, privilege of urban terrain, and 83
Spanos, William 6
spatial movement, in Macunaíma 71
specter
of father 205–07
paternal 191–96
persistence of 205–07
Specters of Marx (Derrida) 185
spectral, specular and
Carlos relating to 221–25
Isilda relating to 221–27
spectral composition, of O Esplendor de Portugal 211–21
spectrality, as decolonial narrative
device for colonial experience 208–10
colonial spaces relating to 227–31, 232
conclusion to 235–36
decrepit narratives and decolonial delinking 232–35
spectral and specular 221–27
spectrality, imperial public sphere and 185–88, 185n3, 189, 195, 201–03
specular image 249
Spivak, Gayatri 271–72
The Splendor of Portugal see O Esplendor de Portugal
Sterne, Laurence 214
subaltern 26, 63, 77
global movement of 19
History and 73
subjectivities 49
subalternity 82, 83, 85, 111, 280
common experiences of 138, 143–44
imperial, of Portugal 16
with imperialism 3, 4, 5, 20, 132
untranslatable 145
Subaltern Studies Collective 9, 12
subaltern subjects, power to 36
subjectivation 12, 13–14, 84–85, 162, 195, 222
gendered 285
intersectionality of 245–50
subjectivities 137
decolonial 67
national 136
racialized 242
subaltern 49
Subjectivity and the Reproduction of Imperial Power (Silva) 12
subject-positions 166, 229, 263, 272
superego 160–67
Super-Prosperos 21
Sylvan, Fernando 3, 15, 18, 24
ambiguities of 116–28
background of 106
‘body-institution’ of 118
on ‘civilização-padrão’ 123–24 (p.318)
on colonialism 125, 127, 136
on communism 125–26
on decolonizing pluri-racial nation 116–28
on ‘Discoveries’ 121–22, 131
on Estado Novo 114, 126
on European racism 122
on European supremacy 123–24
identity unfixed relating to 128–35
as interlocutor 117
interpellation of 118
oeuvre of 106, 128, 136, 137
policies proposed by 117–20
on political autonomy 125
sea in work of 131–32
symbolic function, of father 178
Tamagnini, Isabel 113
Tapanhumas 70
Tapuia 98–99
tavern, Jesus in 281–83, 284
taxonomies 281
Empire relating to 4–5, 45, 85, 237, 272
sexual 196
tchiloli 252–53
‘Ten Thesis on Politics’ (Rancière) 233
‘Terra’ (‘Earth’) (Beja) 259
A terra, a gente e os costumes de Timor (Braga) 112
Tetun-Prasa 145–46
Third Age, of Jesus 269–70
Third World 137, 138–39, 142
‘Third World Literature in the Era of Multinational Capitalism’ (Jameson) 33
Timor 1930: País de Sonho e Encantamento [‘Timor 1930: Country of Dreams and Enchantment’] (Braga) 109
Timorese Social Democratic Association see Associação Social Democrática Timorense
Tlostanova, Madina V. 13, 231
Torok, Maria 29, 180, 188
totalitarian modes, of existence 289
Totem and Taboo (Freud) 63
Toussaint-Samson, Adèle 41, 42
Tragédia do Marquês de Mântua e do Imperador Carlos Magno [‘The Tragedy of the Marquis of Mântua and the Emperor Charlemagne’] (Dias) 252
transcontinentalidade 150
transculturación 76
transculturation renegotiation
culture democratization with 78–79
deculturation 76
nationalism relating to 75–76
repetition with 78
version of 76–77
transgendering, of Jesus 264–67, 280–81, 288
transnational consciousness 24
Tropical Belle Époque 34, 42, 72
Tupi 14, 45, 47, 52, 71, 98–101
A Última Morte do Coronel Santiago [‘The Final Death of Colonel Santiago’] (Cardoso, Luis) 148
O Último Ano em Luanda [‘The Last Year in Luanda’] (Rebelo) 174
Undoing Gender (Butler) 283
United States, East Timor relating to 116
urban industrial imagery 81
Valete 19–20
Vargas, Getúlio (president) 34, 95
propaganda of 96
samba established by 96
Vasconcelos, José 88, 100–01
Verde-Amarelismo movement 26, 71, 97, 98–101, 102
‘Vessel’ see ‘Navio’
Victory (Conrad) 109–10, 115
violence
colonial 182, 186, 191, 205
in Pau Brasil 58–62
sexual 181, 182
‘Visão’ [‘Vision’] (Beja) 237–38, 251, 253
blackness in 240–50
historicization of events in 242
interpellation in 240
intersectionality in 246, 249–50
Medea in 239–40
‘Vision’ see ‘Visão’ (p.319)
‘Wanderings of a Timorese’ see Andanças de um Timorense
Weltanschauung 122
West
expansion of 8
historicism of 67–68
history of 68
imperialism of 1, 3, 6, 7, 10, 44, 50
modernity of 81, 188
narrativization of 50, 72, 79
whiteness 72, 91, 94, 101, 102, 220, 249
colonial 199
compromised 174
discourse of 212, 213
fantasies of 189, 246
of heteronormative masculinity 195
historicization and 73
laws of 181
masculinity relating to 177
metropolitan 247
public image of 210
white superiority 85, 244
white wife 199
white women 202, 205
black women and 178–80, 183, 221, 246–47
cisgendered 178, 191
Figueiredo as 178
The Wolf Man’s Magic Word (Abraham and Torok) 188
women
men and, of color 181
of Portugal 199
‘The World the Portuguese Created’ see O Mundo que o Português Criou
Wretched of the Earth (Fanon) 141
Writing Diaspora (Chow) 248
writings
of Cardoso, Luis 145, 148, 149
of Derrida 11, 27, 29, 78, 134, 185, 188, 203, 284
resistance, inscription, and, of jouissance 156–60 see also scene of writing
Young, Robert J. C. 247–48
Žižek, Slavoj 158–59, 160, 161, 164, 166
Zurara, Gomes Eanes de 2