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Anti-Empire: Decolonial Interventions in Lusophone Literatures$

Daniel F. Silva

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781786941008

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781786941008.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 05 March 2021

(p.ix) Acknowledgments

(p.ix) Acknowledgments

Source:
Anti-Empire: Decolonial Interventions in Lusophone Literatures
Author(s):

Daniel F. Silva

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press

I wish to begin by thanking the numerous individuals who have helped immensely in the publishing process, beginning with the editors of the Contemporary Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures series, L. Elena Delgado and Niamh Thornton, for believing in my project at the earliest stages and providing me with the opportunity to contribute to such an established series. My gratitude must also go to Anthony Cond and Chloe Johnson, my editors at Liverpool University Press, for their constant support and help. Sincere thanks also go to the anonymous reviewers for seeing value in my work and for offering precious feedback and commentary that has vastly improved this project. I must also thank the copy editors and typesetters for their dedicated combing through of my manuscript. I am very gracious, additionally, to every member of the Liverpool University Press team who has in some way worked on my manuscript in the publication process. I thank you for making this book possible.

Very heartfelt thanks must also go to my friends and colleagues at Middlebury College who have both embraced my work and contributed to the ideas contained therein. In addition to the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, I must especially thank Marcos Rohena-Madrazo, Yumna Siddiqi, Nikolina Dobreva, Sujata Moorti, Laurie Essig, and Tamar Mayer. I am also indebted to the amazing students I have had the privilege of teaching at Middlebury. Their sublime engagement with the topics covered in this book has profoundly shaped its premises and has propelled it forward. The Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity and the Anderson Freeman Center have become my intellectual and affective home at Middlebury College.

A most sincere thank you must also go to Lamonte Aidoo for being a true friend, a constant source of encouragement, and a brilliant interlocutor since our days in graduate school. A lot of the ideas and readings proposed here began to take shape during my time as a Ph.D. student at Brown University. I am, therefore, profoundly indebted to numerous professors from whom I had (p.x) the privilege of learning and that deeply impacted the development of this book. These include, but are not limited to, Leonor Simas-Almeida, Nelson H. Vieira, Anani Dzidzienyo, Luiz F. Valente, Olakunle George, Cristiana Bastos, and Miguel Jerónimo Bandeira.

A word of thanks must also go to my entire family for always being supportive and understanding of my work schedule (or lack thereof). Finally, my most profound and infinite thanks to my partner in everything, Jennifer, for her love, support, strength, laughter, brilliance, and for paving smooth roads on life’s arduous journeys.