Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Post-Migratory Cultures in Postcolonial France$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kathryn Kleppinger and Laura Reeck

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781786941138

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781786941138.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 04 April 2020

Un cinéma sans image: Palimpsestic Memory and the Lost History of Cambodian Film

Un cinéma sans image: Palimpsestic Memory and the Lost History of Cambodian Film

Chapter:
(p.79) Un cinéma sans image: Palimpsestic Memory and the Lost History of Cambodian Film
Source:
Post-Migratory Cultures in Postcolonial France
Author(s):

Leslie Barnes

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781786941138.003.0005

Davy Chou’s Le Sommeil d’or (2011) is the first attempt to recount the forgotten history of the Cambodian film industry, a rich and storied archive that all but disappeared with the Khmer Rouge victory in 1975. To make the film, Chou returned to a homeland that is not fully his to capture the memories of a handful of people with whom he shares neither language nor experience. The result, I will suggest, is a work of palimpsestic memory that layers space and time in an attempt to conjure the traces of this lost cultural heritage. Notably however, Chou uses almost none of the surviving footage from the period in his film. This decision, perhaps unusual given the filmmaker’s objective to make the past visible, encourages us to interrogate the ubiquity of the image in relation to the work of memory. Further, having never ‘left’ the homeland on which he now trains his camera, Chou crafts a film that simultaneously privileges and problematizes the idea of return, offering a post-migratory imagining of the second generation’s relationship to the notions of place and belonging, culture and heritage.

Keywords:   Cambodian cinema, genocide, palimpsestic memory, return, cultural heritage

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.