Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Post-Migratory Cultures in Postcolonial France$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kathryn Kleppinger and Laura Reeck

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781786941138

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781786941138.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 06 June 2020

‘Nos ancêtres n’étaient pas tous des Gaulois’: Post-Migration and Bande Dessinée

‘Nos ancêtres n’étaient pas tous des Gaulois’: Post-Migration and Bande Dessinée

Chapter:
(p.219) ‘Nos ancêtres n’étaient pas tous des Gaulois’: Post-Migration and Bande Dessinée
Source:
Post-Migratory Cultures in Postcolonial France
Author(s):

Ilaria Vitali

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781786941138.003.0013

The association between bande dessinée (comics) and second generations might seem surprising, yet it is not new: the authors of Astérix le Gaulois, the most famous and celebrated comics in France, were also the children of immigrants (Polish and Hungarian for Goscinny, Italian for Uderzo). As a hybrid genre that links words and images, comics have been a privileged terrain since their inception for authors of second generations. This art form is now used by postcolonial second-generation authors in France as an ideal artistic medium to express their situation. Raising questions about the representation of minorities, 'new French' from immigrant backgrounds contribute to debates on national identity, and they do so with the unique elements of comics. Their graphic tales thus become an ideal site for observing the representation of cultural alterity and the use of forms of engagement that, in departing from entrenched practices, now acquire a new meaning. This chapter will trace the complexity of relations between comics and second-generation Maghrebis in France by following work by Farid Boudjellal, Halim Mahmoudi and the Gargouri sisters.

Keywords:   bande dessinée, comics, Farid Boudjellal, Halim Mahmoudi, Gargouri Sisters

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.