Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Socialism and the Diasporic 'Other'A Comparative Study of Irish Catholic and Jewish Radical and Communal Politics in East London, 1889-1912$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Daniel Renshaw

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781786941220

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781786941220.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 06 June 2020

Diaspora, Migration, and Irish–Jewish Interactions in London, 1800–1889

Diaspora, Migration, and Irish–Jewish Interactions in London, 1800–1889

Chapter:
(p.15) 1 Diaspora, Migration, and Irish–Jewish Interactions in London, 1800–1889
Source:
Socialism and the Diasporic 'Other'
Author(s):

Daniel Renshaw

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781786941220.003.0002

This chapter examines the roots of the Jewish and Irish communities in East London from the medieval period up to the last decade of the nineteenth century, as well as the confluences and differences in the Jewish and Irish experiences of diaspora and migration. It discusses how the Irish and Jewish proletariats interacted in Georgian and Victorian London, both economically and socially. When discussing migration to Britain, it identifies divergences in the factors behind Irish and Jewish settlement, especially in attitudes towards the homeland migrants were leaving, and the country in which they were settling. For the Irish there was a durable myth of return to Ireland, as well as a continuing hostility towards the British state. For Jews, the break with Eastern Europe was usually a permanent one, and settlement in Britain was more likely to be free of resentment towards the country in which they made their homes.

Keywords:   diaspora, migration, East London, Ireland, Eastern Europe, Victorian, myth of return

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.