Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Intimate FrontiersA Literary Geography of the Amazon$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Felipe Martínez-Pinzón and Javier Uriarte

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781786941831

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781786941831.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 06 June 2020

The Jungle Like a Sunday at Home: Rafael Uribe Uribe, Miguel Triana, and the Nationalization of the Amazon

The Jungle Like a Sunday at Home: Rafael Uribe Uribe, Miguel Triana, and the Nationalization of the Amazon

Chapter:
(p.23) The Jungle Like a Sunday at Home: Rafael Uribe Uribe, Miguel Triana, and the Nationalization of the Amazon
Source:
Intimate Frontiers
Author(s):

Felipe Martínez-Pinzón

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781786941831.003.0002

This essay analyzes two civilizing elite projects produced in order to incorporate the Putumayo’s population, its history and its territory, to Colombia during the first decade of the 20th century. By proposing a reading of General Rafael Uribe Uribe’s Reducción de Salvajes (1907) and Miguel Triana’s Por el sur de Colombia (1907), Martínez-Pinzón shows how these projects negotiated language and heterogeneity in the southern border province of Putumayo. Alternatively mixing military strategy with an appeal to “science” Uribe Uribe’s “nationalizing strategy” proposed expropriating Putumayo indigenous populations from their language, their land and finally their bodies by way of bringing in white immigrants to dissolve “indigenous blood” through miscegenation. Martínez-Pinzón argues that, in contrast, Triana produces in his travelogue a self-criticizing stance in order to exhibit the ignorant hubris of civilizing creoles that contradictorily saw indigenous cultures as being anti-national at the same time needing their labor for the agro-export economy. Finally, the author contends that Triana’s proposal of constructing an indigenous history of Colombia is a political tactic to legitimize Colombian state control over the Putumayo territory amidst the turn of the century diplomatic tensions and military conflicts over the Amazon.

Keywords:   Putumayo, Nationalizing Amazonia, Colombia’s civilizing projects, Rafael Uribe Uribe (1859-1914), Miguel Triana (1859-1931), Por el sur de Colombia: excursion pintoresca y científica (1907)

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.