Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Public SecretsRace and Colour in Colonial and Independent Jamaica$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Henrice Altink

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781789620009

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781789620009.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

Commitment to Colour-Blindness

Commitment to Colour-Blindness

Chapter:
(p.160) Chapter Four Commitment to Colour-Blindness
Source:
Public Secrets
Author(s):

Henrice Altink

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781789620009.003.0005

This chapter zooms in on colour blindness. Focussing on the racial domains of politics and criminal justice, it explores the correlation between race and colour and the enjoyment of civil and political rights. It argues that it was not just government inaction but also a lack of collective action from race-first and other groups why dark-skinned Jamaicans struggled more than others to exercise their civil and political rights. But while successive governments lacked the commitment to create a society where all Jamaicans irrespective of race and colour could enjoy their ‘fundamental rights’, they did their best to present Jamaica as a colour-blind nation. This chapter will also explore the purposes of this myth of racial harmony that was developed after the Second World War.

Keywords:   colour blindness, Rastafari, Black Power, Rights, racial harmony, independence, constitution, legal system

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.