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Transatlantic StudiesLatin America, Iberia, and Africa$
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Cecilia Enjuto-Rangel, Sebastiaan Faber, Pedro García-Caro, and Robert Patrick Newcomb

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781789620252

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781789620252.001.0001

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The Good Monarchical Government: Popular Translations of Spanish Political Thought during Mexico’s Independence

The Good Monarchical Government: Popular Translations of Spanish Political Thought during Mexico’s Independence

Chapter:
(p.361) Chapter Twenty-Nine The Good Monarchical Government: Popular Translations of Spanish Political Thought during Mexico’s Independence
Source:
Transatlantic Studies
Author(s):

Marco Antonio Landavazo

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781789620252.003.0030

In the Mexican war of independence, patriot’s armies famously repeated, “Long live the king and down with the bad government!”, a political slogan related to the spanish populist doctrines and to what we could call the monarchical tradition of good government. The cry of disdain toward the viceregal government and of acceptance of the king indicates not only obedience to him but it appeals to him: it is a call to an arbitrator who can intervene in the political and social games and force one of their adversaries, in this case the government of New Spain, to act according to the established rules—those of a good government. This paper focuses on the way this rebellious rhetoric shows us how age-old political and ideological traditions stemming from Europe, and the American reproduction of them, saw their expiration date when the leader of the good government Fernando VII, in the eyes of the Mexican patriots, had become a tyrant

Keywords:   Mexican Independence, Popular Translations, Spanish Political Thought, Good Monarchical Government, Fernando VII

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