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Criminal MovesModes of Mobility in Crime Fiction$
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Jesper Gulddal, Alistair Rolls, and Stewart King

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781789620580

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781789620580.001.0001

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Reading Affects in Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep

Reading Affects in Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep

Chapter:
(p.60) Chapter Three Reading Affects in Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep
Source:
Criminal Moves
Author(s):

Heta Pyrhönen

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781789620580.003.0004

This chapter challenges the idea that stock genres evoke stock emotions. In the case of crime fiction, the anticipated movement is from the uncertainty of an unsolved crime towards the certainty of resolution. In the case of Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep, however, Marlowe’s change of mood invites readers to notice that while they are immersed in the suspense of the text, and thus rushed along on the roller-coaster of end-orientation, they also process the characters’ feelings, which do not necessarily move in the same direction or at the same pace. The emotions displayed in The Big Sleep suggest that crime fiction has a far broader emotional range. The chapter draws on these reading affects to challenge the authority of the novel’s solution.

Keywords:   affect, emotions, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, end-orientation

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