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Postcolonial Realms of MemorySites and Symbols in Modern France$
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Etienne Achille, Charles Forsdick, and Lydie Moudileno

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781789620665

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781789620665.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 27 July 2021

The Mediterranean

The Mediterranean

Chapter:
(p.128) The Mediterranean
Source:
Postcolonial Realms of Memory
Author(s):

Kathryn Kleppinger

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781789620665.003.0012

This essay demonstrates how unique geographic characteristics of the Mediterranean Sea dramatically shaped European colonial policy throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The Mediterranean Sea created critical trade routes made the colonization of Algeria, Tunisia, and Morocco not only politically useful for establishing and maintaining France’s power relative to other European nations but also economically vital for France’s industrial production. After the decline of the French colonial empire, national immigration policies were dictated by the desire to maintain France’s economic strength and political influence in the region by controlling its surroundings in the Mediterranean. While the Mediterranean once represented the possibility of expanded control and geopolitical power, it now represents just the opposite, a source of anarchy and chaos that is frequently seen as requiring strong border control.

Keywords:   Migration, Borders, Napoleon, North Africa, Middle East

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