Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Inside the invisibleMemorialising Slavery and Freedom in the Life and Works of Lubaina Himid$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Celeste-Marie Bernier, Alan Rice, Lubaina Himid, and Hannah Durkin

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781789620856

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781789620856.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 14 May 2021

‘The slave servant’: Guerrilla Memorialisation and Multi-accented Performances in Naming the Money (2004)

‘The slave servant’: Guerrilla Memorialisation and Multi-accented Performances in Naming the Money (2004)

Chapter:
(p.201) 9 ‘The slave servant’: Guerrilla Memorialisation and Multi-accented Performances in Naming the Money (2004)
Source:
Inside the invisible
Author(s):

Celeste-Marie Bernier

Alan Rice

Lubaina Himid

Hannah Durkin

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781789620856.003.0012

‘Naming the Money’ has become Himid’s signature installation, consisting of 100 colourfully painted figures interacting with each other across a large gallery space accompanied by a soundscape. It speaks to the history of Transatlantic Slavery and to modern modes of labour, which have in common the destruction of identities through the movement across geographies. Scraps of text on accounting paper on the backs of each figure tell poetically the journey of these people through the change in their names when in the new place. The figures act as a guerrilla memorialisation of multiple African diasporic figures who have been forgotten by history. Through the theoretical writings of Paul Ricoeur, Michael Rothberg, Stuart Hall, Dionne Brand, Hershini Bhana Young, Saidiya Hartman and Giorgio Agamben the chapter explicated the ways in which Himid uses her installation to comment on historical and contemporary trauma and those who are lost and displaced, then and now.

Keywords:   Lubaina Himid, slavery, agency, trauma, history, waste, guerrilla memorialisation, witnessing, naming, African homeland, European exile, masquerade, accountancy, finance, trafficking, economics, capitalism

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.