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Inside the invisibleMemorialising Slavery and Freedom in the Life and Works of Lubaina Himid$
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Celeste-Marie Bernier, Alan Rice, Lubaina Himid, and Hannah Durkin

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781789620856

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781789620856.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 14 May 2021

Intervention, Mapping and Excavation: White Caricatures versus Black Dehumanisation in Swallow Hard: The Lancaster Dinner Service (2007)

Intervention, Mapping and Excavation: White Caricatures versus Black Dehumanisation in Swallow Hard: The Lancaster Dinner Service (2007)

Chapter:
(p.217) 10 Intervention, Mapping and Excavation: White Caricatures versus Black Dehumanisation in Swallow Hard: The Lancaster Dinner Service (2007)
Source:
Inside the invisible
Author(s):

Celeste-Marie Bernier

Alan Rice

Lubaina Himid

Hannah Durkin

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781789620856.003.0013

Swallow Hard: The Lancaster Dinner Service was part of the Abolished? exhibition in Lancaster. It uses overpainted eighteenth and early nineteenth century plates, tureens, jugs and dishes to comment on the legacy of slavery in the port town. It displays caricatured white figures which interrogate Lancaster’s slave-produced wealth and noble black figures which memorialise a black presence that has been forgotten in histories of the town. Other images explore local flora and fauna and the slave ships, built in the city, sailing to Africa and then sold on so others can continue the trade. It speaks to the conspicuous consumption built on the exploitation of human traffic and the consequences for those who are exploited. Working against nostalgia for confected histories she shows the full human costs of imperial wealth. Her work cannot fully make amends for the traumatic past but expresses artistically forgotten and elided histories.

Keywords:   Lubaina Himid, remembering, amnesia, guerrilla memorialisation, slavery, history, Lancaster, black presence, black absence, stereotypes, mahogany, furniture, Gillows, overpainting, antiques, conspicuous consumption, modernity, abject, colonial bodies, tableware

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