Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

George Alexander Gazis and Anthony Hooper

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9781789621495

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2022

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781789621495.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 05 July 2022

Renovating the House of Hades

Renovating the House of Hades

Cult Extensions and Socratic Reconstructions1

Chapter:
(p.153) 9 Renovating the House of Hades
Source:
Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature
Author(s):

Anthony Hooper

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781789621495.003.0009

Chapter nine utilises the metaphor of extension-building to examine the different ways in which important religious and philosophical thinkers appropriated and adapted poetic visions of the Underworld. Hooper argues that the Homeric vision of the House of Hades represented an attractive and flexible vision of the Underworld, which later thinkers could draw on in order to conceptualise and communicate their novel thinking concerning post-mortem fate. Hooper contrasts the extension-building undertaken in representations of Eleusinian eschatological thought with the more radical procedure of Plato’s Socrates. Taking the Myth of Er of the Republic as a case study, Hooper argues that Socrates deploys traditional material to ensure that his audience never feels ‘quite at home’ in this Underworld journey in order to provoke reflection on the key philosophical issues raised in this passage.

Keywords:   Hades, underworld, homeric, eleusinian, Socrates, Myth of Er, Plato

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.