Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Britain's Black Past$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Gretchen H. Gerzina

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781789621600

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781789621600.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 28 January 2022

Ghostly Presences, Servants and Runaways: Lancaster’s Emerging Black Histories and their Memorialization 1687–1865

Ghostly Presences, Servants and Runaways: Lancaster’s Emerging Black Histories and their Memorialization 1687–1865

Chapter:
(p.179) Chapter Ten Ghostly Presences, Servants and Runaways: Lancaster’s Emerging Black Histories and their Memorialization 1687–1865
Source:
Britain's Black Past
Author(s):

Alan Rice

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781789621600.003.0011

Here, Alan Rice offers examples of a black presence in Lancaster, the fourth largest slave port in England. These findings, often in the form of archival fragments, expose a hidden history and puncture the narrative of the city’s success based on myths of mercantile glory. Examples include a rediscovered pamphlet by ex-slave James Johnson recounting his wanderings throughout the region in search of employment during the Cotton Famine; the memorialization of Sambo, a young slave who died during a brief visit; the day-book of merchant Henry Tindall noting the arrival of a slave chaperoning two young white boys; unearthed baptismal records and runaway slave ads; and a macabre family heirloom—the mummified hand of a favored slave—eventually buried by a descendant of the slave-owning merchant family. Finally, Rice offers the finances of three prosperous Lancashire merchants (Thomas Hodgson, James Sawrey and Thomas Hinde)—all prominent in the slave trade—to show how the money they invested in the region’s economy which helped drive the industrial revolution, were funded by profits of the slave trade. Rice suggests that these evidentiary snippets of a black presence in Lancaster can be a pathway to uncovering even more and serve to illuminate the connection between the city’s development and the forced labor of enslaved people.

Keywords:   Lancaster, Slave trade, Cotton Famine, Industrial Revolution, Sambo, James Johnson

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.