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The Hangover after the HandoverThings, Places and Cultural Icons in Hong Kong$
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Helena Y.W. Wu

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781789621952

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781789621952.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 28 June 2022

Introduction: The Hangover after the Handover

Introduction: The Hangover after the Handover

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction: The Hangover after the Handover
Source:
The Hangover after the Handover
Author(s):

Helena Y.W. Wu

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781789621952.003.0001

The introductory chapter puts forward the notion of “hangover” to scrutinize the so-called colonial-postcolonial transition of Hong Kong after the handover in 1997. With an eye to the cultural, social and political landscape, the chapter explores how Hong Kong undergoes a dual hangover from the last years of British colonial rule, in which the administration made attempts to accelerate localization, democratization and institutionalization, and after the taken-for-granted state following the handover, in which the post-1997 authorities’ rhetorical claims of decolonization are contained within the frames of nationalization and globalization. In view of the cultural, social and political forces in flux, the multiple entry points introduced by this chapter open up a space to critically interrogate the further transition of Hong Kong from the post-handover to the post-hangover during the 2010s and the manifold impacts on the local, national and global levels.

Keywords:   Colonialism, Postcolonialism, Civil disobedience, China policy, Sinophone studies, Decolonization, Globalization, Nationalization, Hong Kong-China relation, Chineseness

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