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Figures of Authority in Nineteenth-Century Ireland$
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Raphaël Ingelbien and Susan Galavan

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781789622409

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781789622409.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 06 July 2022

Power, Patronage and the Production of Catholic Material Culture in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

Power, Patronage and the Production of Catholic Material Culture in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

Chapter:
(p.139) 7 Power, Patronage and the Production of Catholic Material Culture in Nineteenth-Century Ireland
Source:
Figures of Authority in Nineteenth-Century Ireland
Author(s):

Caroline M. McGee

Publisher:
Discontinued
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781789622409.003.0008

This chapter examines Catholic religious authority in the context of the production and consumption of ecclesiastical architecture and art. It moves beyond consideration of this material culture from nation-state or formalist art-historical perspectives to explore the levels of human autonomy and agency that came to bear on building and decorating projects at the turn of the nineteenth century. Using a case study model, it analyses the multiple forms of authority inscribed in Catholic Church buildings whose aesthetic shifted from the modest to the sublime during the period. In so doing, it demonstrates the impact of religious power on architects, transnational commercial art industry businesses, and lay donors, and produces a more nuanced cross-disciplinary picture of the multiple cultural meanings, tangible and intangible, of nineteenth-century ecclesiastical architecture and the people behind its production.

Keywords:   Catholic church, architecture, transnational business networks, art industry, patronage

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