Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Poetry & MoneyA Speculation$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Peter Robinson

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781789622539

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781789622539.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

Circulatory checks and balances

Circulatory checks and balances

Chapter:
(p.187) Chapter Nine Circulatory checks and balances
Source:
Poetry & Money
Author(s):

Peter Robinson

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781789622539.003.0009

The proposal ramified in the previous chapter, namely that the forms of poems can act upon the conditions that they contain, is further explored and exemplified with particular reference to the speed of rhythmic and metrical movement. This is in turn shown to be inversely related to the dictional burden of a poem’s words. The chapter begins by returning to the example of Ezra Pound, and a recent reading of the late Thrones Cantos, a reading which canvases but finally rejects rejects analogies between the numbers of accountancy and those of its poetic metrics. Works by J. H. Prynne, Adrian Stokes, and Geoffrey Hill are then employed to promulgate a conception of poetic rhythm figuring the poet’s technique with regard to language as analogous to a central banker’s means for stabilizing the value of a currency.

Keywords:   numbers, measure, circulation, poetic language, rhythm, Geoffrey Hill, Adrian Stokes, Ezra Pound, J. H. Prynne

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.