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The Global Challenge of Peace1919 as a Contested Threshold to a New World Order$
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Matt Perry

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9781800857193

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2022

DOI: 10.3828/liverpool/9781800857193.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 29 June 2022

The German Revolution at War’s End

The German Revolution at War’s End

Whose Revolution?

Chapter:
(p.271) 15 The German Revolution at War’s End
Source:
The Global Challenge of Peace
Author(s):

Anthony McElligott

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.3828/liverpool/9781800857193.003.0016

This chapter considers the revolution that broke out in November 1918 in Germany that encompassed a naval and army mutiny, the spread of sailors, soldiers and workers’ councils across Germany and the declaration of the republic. The chapter assesses the contested readings of the German revolution on its centenary and tries to make sense of the event through the lens of contemporaries. In particular, amongst several other observes, it probes Alfred Döblin’s rich literary account of the revolution, an author most famed for Berlin Alexanderplatz (1929). At a conceptual level, the chapter analyzes the German revolution through a comparative typology: revolution of the people, revolution for the people, and revolution without the people. These three frames help to explain the contested meanings of, and uses to which, the revolution has been put. Rather than a singular revolution, then, the German Revolution was the sum of different understanding of revolution of both observers and participants.

Keywords:   German Revolution 1918, Alfred Döblin, Berlin Alexanderplatz (1929), Workers’ and Soldiers’ Council, Revolutionary Shop Stewards (revolutionäre Obleute), Victor Klemperer

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